Tag Archives: water

Froth, Perhaps the Best of Us

via Daily Prompt: Froth

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Taken a while back, the Blackwood River on the north side of Boyup Brook, froth in the foreground, foam to the middle left.

Froth in water, be it lakes, rivers, creeks or the ocean, is generally a combination of pressure or agitation (so, rushing water, or crashing waves creating bubbles), the matter from decomposing plants such as oils (in Australia one significant culprit is eucalyptus), dead plant tissues, dust making froth or foam, and protein (which is also a common contributor to foam in expelled urine). Many people imagine that someone has dumped detergent in the water, given the dramatic effect of the froth or foam, and yet it is all natural ingredients contributing to the phenomena.

Froth or foam is not ordinarily considered to be a negative. That which occurs naturally in water is quite normal and shows nature in process. In some circles a froth on top of a glass of beer is considered a good thing as it indicates that the beer is not flat or lacking. In firefighting foam has been utilized in combating fires involving flammable liquids, the foam restricts oxygen thus preventing fire. Detergent froth and foam is seen as useful in that the foam is the detergent becoming active when needed. And we have all at some point utilized pretrochemical foams in mattresses and pillows, etc. But froth and foam have been used negatively in literature. The old saying, “it’s all froth and bubble” is a form of ridicule applied to any situation you wish to criticise:- The speech was all froth and bubble” meaning, the speech was lacking substance.

Everything has its good and not so good side, or, everything has both strengths and weaknesses, froth and foam are no different. But the weaknesses are few and overall froth and foam make such a valualble contribution to nature and to life. In some ways we can see froth and foam as a metaphor for ourselves. We all have our strengths and weaknesses. I have a view that our weaknesses are few in comparison to our strengths, and we all make a valuable contribution, and often not just in our core vocation, but in what my grandparents might have considered stuff that was froth and bubble – hobbies, interests, leisure activities, creativity – the things that make us come alive, energise us and carry us (and others with us) through.

Froth and foam are the result of aggitation and energy and natural ingredients, this is not unlike ourselves. When we are aggitated, put under pressure, stimulated, enabled, we can produce all sorts of creative things. Froth and bubble are signs of life, signs of substance, a parallel to cream – the best rising to the top. When we are energised the creative rises to the top, sometimes dramatically, and for all to see, just like frothy waves, or foam enveloped waters. Life is not all froth and bubble, but when the good and the creative rises to the top it is to be seen, shared and celebrated.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Rush

via Daily Prompt: Rush

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I took this photo when Jon and I went to Bluff Knoll a couple of years ago. It was raining towards the top, and given the the sides of the mount were almost vertical in long sections, the rain rushed, hurtled down in streams. I love the sound of rushing water, it is something I’ve liked since I was a child, and this day was no different, it was a real treat. The other experience, inevitable really, was that we got soaked, and I didn’t mind that either. When I was a kid I’d run around without my raincoat on and rejoice in the rain. To play on the word rush, I got a rush out of the rain, and out of the rushing water.

Over the years I’ve experienced a rush in different ways, the usual suspects, drugs, alcohol, sugars, speed, abseiling, sport, travelling, bush walking, and the list goes on. It took time to learn to simply enjoy the moment, to attend to the experience as it was without seeking after it. It took time too, to emmerse in the experience without just consuming it. Of course it was partly learning and maturing, but it was also learning to let go and to deepen in the experience. There is something about experiencing a rush, a peak moment, to reach the pinnacle, but to do so without rushing it because the quality is richer and lasting. Not everything has to be immediate.

Who could forget the clasic Aesop fable ‘The Tortoise and the Hare” where the hare presumes to beat the slow moving tortiose, and yet through over-confidence and arrogance loses. Aesop simply making an observation about life, it’s how we are when we don’t immerse and attend.

I love this quote from Tolstoy: “The two most powerful warriors are patience and time.” and Rousseau: “Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.” The reverse is also true.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Wrinkle

via Daily Prompt: Wrinkle

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A rock face along one side of Kings Canyon. Wrinkled, weathered sandstone. The cause? Rain, wind and sun. Not unlike skin weathering from the same sources. In the millennia past it was moving water, a river or two, a lake, that weathered these rocks in the Katarrka National Park.

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And from the same section, rippled sandstone reflecting the movement of wind and water across the surface of the rock.

In high school I had an art teacher who decided to show us the power of water. He rigged up a large plastic bottle and placed opal in it, and hooked up a belt and motor to turn the bottle, which also had sand and water in it. Over a year there was some change in the rock, it was smoother, the water and sand had begun to have an affect. Which reminds me of a Japanese saying: “In the struggle between the stone and water, in time the water wins.” But the rock is not destroyed, it is transformed, Transformed in to sand, pebbles, and rocks.

Our bodies take a hammering from the elements, just like the rock. I like to think that our bodies are well worn rock, where the rock has begun to smooth off and yet not lose its strength or character. In fact, as we age, I think we gain more strength and character. In this way rock and water are in parnership, and change results. Our wrinkles, both the outward and the inner ones, are the result of the forces of wear and pressure, they reflect a life lived. It’s the inner ones, the psychological scars that last the longest, and take time to be transfomed, but they are as and when we let our inner self be exposed to the forces of transformation.

Paul,

pvcann.com

 

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That Sound, That Feel

via Daily Prompt: Undulate

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The waves are gentle, 
a rythmical undulation 
like inward and outward breaths of meditation, 
a life giving force that captivates the heart, 
and takes prisoner the mind and thralls it with wonderment. 
Gliding along I enter a new space and feel refreshed. 
There's something about being on the water. 
It's not possession, 
because this is a privileged and shared space, 
no, it's about surrender to the water, and all that it brings. 
The water rythmically laps the sides of the kayak, 
the undulation, beautiful. 
Nothing profound, 
simple, joyful ... gift.
It is late, and yet the day is just beginning, 
undualting,
water,
soul friend.

©Paul Cannon 2018

Paul,

pvcann.com

 

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Launch

via Daily Prompt: Launch

 

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Sometimes even the sheer effort can be daunting, all the prep, all the organising and the getting there, but once launched, it’s really worth it. There’s something really meditative about kayaking, the smell of the water, salty downstream, brackish upstream. There’s plenty for the eye to rejoice in, dolphins, stingrays, King George Whiting, black swans and a host of birdlife (some migratory). There are sounds too, birds calling, wind rustling vegetation. And there’s the sound of the water lapping on the side of the kayak, and the sound of my paddle as it divides the water and pushes. But it is not overly intrusive, the kayak is gentle on its surrounds, respectful of nature. The fish and birds come close, they trust the quiet nature of this vessel, and so do I, it is an invitation to presence and calm, even stillness (which is not an absence of movement per se). When I launch the kayak, I launch into something too, something deep.

Paul

pvcann.com

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Irrelevant

via Daily Prompt: Irrelevant

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Gnamma holes, one guarded, one not. There was no plaque to say what the metal contraption was really for. Clearly it would not deter a child let alone an adult (not that it seemed to be drinkable, though if you were despereate enough it would get you by), nor small animals, and seemed to enable room for roos to duck in and get a drink. there were no fittings at the top of the metal guard to suggest it was for anything more sophisitcated. Besides, the gnamma hole was not overly deep – about waist level. The only possibility was that it would deter the more ungainly, less agile and feral camels from using this limited source of water and depriving native animals. However, the metal guard was irrelevant, given that the neighbouring gnamma hole was unguarded (and there were two guarded gnamma holes and several others unguarded further along), so what was the point?

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Magnetic

via Daily Prompt: Magnetic

On a previous trip to Kathleen Springs it had rained the week before we got there, and the creek was running, and had trickled over the pathway. Water is vital for most living things and especially for butterflies, and indeed, you could say that for butterflies water is magnetic. The video clip doesn’t do the scene justice as there were was a multitude of butterflies around the puddle, and of course, they wouldn’t stay still, but there they were, flocking to the water for much needed moisture. I find butterflies absolutely delightful, and this was a wonderful moment to see so many in one place.

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Volume

via Daily Prompt: Volume

 

The volume is loud and high. The sound of the water was wonderful as it thundered underneath the road and out into the open again. And the Blackwood River was rising high as the volume of water from upstream surged down through Boyup Brook.

The short video was taken at the crossing at Terry Road, just off Jayes Road. And in the photo you can see that the road had been gouged by the force of the water. It was refreshing because the winter rains flush the river and creek systems and bring fresh water and renewal to the ecosystems along the way.

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