Tag Archives: Uluru

There’s Nothing Slight About The Moon

via Daily Prompt: Slight

 

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The moon slightly above Uluru, late afternoon.

“The full moon  – the mandala of the sky” (Tom Robbins)

“The moon does not fight. It attacks no one. It does not worry. It does not try to crush others. It keeps its course, but by its very nature, it gently influences. What other body could pull an entire ocean from shore to shore? The moon is faithful to its nature and its power is never diminished.” (Ming Dao Deng)

The recent blue moon drew crowds outdoors to have a look, as did the blood moon before that. Eclipses are a particular draw card. I think many people look up when they go out at night, they like to see the stars, but I think everyone likes to catch a glimpse of the moon. The moon draws us just like it draws the tides. There is nothing slight about the moon.

We desired the moon, we had to conquer it, and so we went there. We’ve serenaded the moon in song, and we’ve painted it in poems, we’ve seen it’s dark side (but not our own).

But, following Ming Dao Deng, I love the mindful moon. It is a beacon in the night, the sun has not abandoned it, it is not alone, it works with the sun and the stars to light the night, just enough for us not to feel alone either. Deng’s description of this faithful sentinel is of course a metaphor for life. The moon contributes to life, it doesn’t take, it isn’t greedy, it isn’t egotistical. Instead, the moon is gentle, proof that just being is sufficient for us to shine. By its faithfulness to being its true self, the moon retains its power, it is never diminished in any way, yet it is always giving.

If only we were to take that example, and be, just like the moon, gentle, faithful, calm, cooperative, and reflective. And in our being, draw others. Imagine that! To be light for others in their darkest nights, to shine hope in to the world, to remind the world that our light reflects something deeper, that our life is gentle, giving, inviting. In our true self we are ever undiminished, shining (“Like the moon, and the stars, and the sun” John Lennon) as gift to the world.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under astronomy, bush walking, Country, life, mindfulness, nature, quote

Conscious Authenticity

via Daily Prompt: Authentic

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Sunset at Uluru, one of my many favourite photos of the rock, taken last year. Uluru is a well known Aussie icon. Primarily it is an indigenous sacred site, but in a broader sense it is a well known visual associated with Australia as a country. For us Uluru is as authentic as it gets for an icon, along with the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge. But Uluru is a natural wonder. The icons created by human endeavour are sleek, well designed and engineered, repaired and maintained. But Uluru was forged through time, weathered, beaten by the elements, sometimes shedding its skin as layers peeled off. It is old and wise and has many stories to tell, It has scars and wounds to show beneath its grandeur and striking presence.

We are a little like that. Forged through time, we grow and develop, mature. Along the way we are a little weathered, and beaten by the elements. And there are, perhaps, times when we psychologically shed our skin. We may well feel our age, but not many of us would admit to being wise – usually that is a label applied by others who experience us, and yet, in my experience,  every person carries a wisdom of their own. And we certainly have many stories to tell, especially because we have wounds and scars that are our story.

"Real isn't how you are made," said the Skin Horse. 
"It's a thing that happens to you. When a child loves you for a long, 
long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you 
become Real.'
 
"Does it hurt?" Asked the Rabbit.

"Sometimes." said the Skin Horse, for he was always truthful. 
"When you are Real you don't mind being hurt."

"Does it happen all at once, like being wound up," he asked, 
"or bit by bit?"

"It doesn't happen all at once," said the Skin Horse. "You become. 
It takes a long time. That's why it doesn't happen often to people 
who break easily, or have sharp edges, or have to be carefully kept. 
Generally, by the time yo are Real, most of your hair has been loved 
off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very 
shabby. But these things don't matter at all, because once you are 
real you can't be ugly, except to people who don't understand. 

Margery Williams Bianco "The Velveteen Rabbit"

Unless we risk love, unless we risk vulnreability, we cannot become, we cannot be, And we cannot be real. The sort of risk I understand is expressed perfectly by the Skin Horse, that we loved and held to the point that we are both hurt and yet whole. But in the main it is our scars and wounds that really make us. They don’t define us, they help make us, help us to become, help us to grow and be authentic.

To be authentic isn’t to be a thing, to be some predetermined you, to be ‘someone’. Authenticity doesn’t come down from the heavens, it isn’t randomly assigned to you. To be authentic is to simply be the you you already are. But you can’t be that person unless you risk the scars and wounds of living, it is a slow thing, it takes a long time, but it is to have lived and to have been real.

As Brene Brown has said: “Authenticity is not something we have or don’t have. It’s a practice – a conscious choice of how we want to live. Authenticity is a collection of choices that we have to make every day. It’s about the choice to show up and be real. The choice to be honest. The choice to let our true selves be seen.”

I really like that, “Life is a collection of choices.”  and, that it is “a practice, a conscious choice.” Authenticity is something we can do.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under bush walking, Country, life, mindfulness, psychology, quote, self-development, Uluru 17

Get a Perspective

via Daily Prompt: Above

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There’s something about being on top of a mountain, or even just a rise. The views can be eyecatching, if not stunning. There’s something even more about being high enough to be in the clouds, it’s an ethereal experience. The air is cooler, the mist turns to rain, the clouds swirl as the wind pushes against the mountain, apart from the birds, the wind and rain, there is no noise, no unnatural noise. And, if there’s a gap in the cloud, you can see for miles. It’s a totally different perspective to the ground level view.

The ancients liked to think that mountains were close to their deity, the mountains reached up to the heavens, so they must be sacred places of meeting between gods and people. The people of Israel had a special affinity with Mt. Sinai where Moses received the content of the ten commands. For the ancient Greeks Mt. Olympus was the home of the Greek Gods, and Mt. Athos was the holy mountain. In Tibet Mt. Kaillash is sacred, for the Incas it was Macchu Picchu, in Japan Koya-san is sacred, in Australia Uluru is sacred, and in New Zealand it is Mt. Taranaki. There are many more, and there isn’t a geographical region that doesn’t have a sacred mountain, such that it would suggest that the ancients felt a deep spiritual connection with certain mountains, and the fact that this crosses over every culture and continent is significant.

Mountains are places for reflection, meditation, you can also clear your head. So for me there is a mindfulness about being up a mountain, or a rock or a rise. And it speaks to perespective, how we see something in overview, as oposed to ground level view where everything is foreshortened and not so visisble. Being above ourselves in a mindful observing way, might give us perspective on our growth, our goals, behaviour and so on. Being above community in a mindful observing way might give us a better perspective on our relationships, what might be really happening, we might see potential, possibility, and gain a sense of hope.

There is also the opportunity to put ourselves in perspective simply by the sheer disparity in our own smallness in comparison to the height of the rise, and the vast plains below. So in that sense, we can prevent ourselves from literally getting above ourselves in a negative sense, and maintain a balanced perspective of self and life. Take an overview from above, and get a different perspective.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under bush walking, environment, life, nature, religion, Spirituality

Dominant Red

via Daily Prompt: Dominant

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Red soil is dominant in our center – hence the well known term Red Center. And so is Uluru in the distance. There is a connection, the sand is the breakdown of sandstone of which Uluru and many of the formations in the Center are comprised of, as well as some granite outcrops. The dominant red colour is caused by the presence of ferric iron oxides, and also certain types of organic matter, which cause the redness in both rock and sand.

The redness changes with the light, as might be expected. Dawn and sunset intensify the colour, which over an hour becomes a beautiful pallette.

I found myself singing “Red soil in the sunset” (with apologies to Nat King Cole and a horde of others who sang “Red Sails in the Sunset).

I love the colour, I find it captivating, moving, exhilarating. We all know red to be the colour for danger. I read somewhere years ago that red is the colour of action, and in ancient eastern culture red is the root chakra symbolising life and energy. Red also has the slowest wave lengths yet it is the most stimulating colour, it has that affect on me. My fave and dominant red is Shiraz 🙂

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Treat

via Daily Prompt: Treat

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It’s hard to explain, but for me it was a treat to see ancient indigenous paintings at Uluru on two of our visits. There is something about the self encountering the work of a community from a different time. To think that hundreds, if not thousands, of years ago someone painted this story or series of stories for us to enjoy and learn from now, and into the future. It was real treat just to see it and experience th efact that this was ancient, this was created by a person so long ago, this was part of a meaning for a culture so long ago. A treat and a privilege. But it also made me wonder – what will I leave for future generations, what impression will I leave, what will they learn from me? What is my gift?

Paul,

pvacann.com

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Filed under art, bush walking, community, Country, history, life, nature

Black Night

via Daily Prompt: Black

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The darkness is pierced by the fibre optic light show in the Field of Lights at Uluru, it had shifted to a red glow in the sequence of colours.  Dawn will come and that greatest of stars, the sun, will replace the darkness completely. And the night is never completely black, there is always some light piercing the darkness from the vast reaches of the galaxy. I like to think of people like that, that there is some light, even in those we believe to be the worst people. Darkness cannot extinguish the light.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under bush walking, Country, nature, Space, Uluru 17

Faint

via Daily Prompt: Faint

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There we were at Uluru, and in a part I hadn’t been to previously some years ago. There was, and not uncommonly, an overhang or shelter in the rock, and on the surface of the shelter there was this faint art work, which is ancient. I just cannot remember the meaning of this particular piece (others will remind me), but in every way it holds a significance and beauty I cannot put into words – you had to be there to experience it. What moves is the age, the simplicity (in my perception), the depth of meaning behind the simplicity, and just the simple fact that here I was, in 2017, close to this work which was ancient. Who had communicated this, what was it like, what did it say about them. However, the author of this work would probably ask no such questions. For me it was faint and faded but precious. And a faint call that turned to a roar,  of something about relationship, otherness, community, and life through time. Life in presence, attention and awareness. Strange how something faint, something beyond my experience, could be so profound and powerful.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under art, Country, history, life, Philosophy/Theology, Spirituality, Uluru 17

Buried Underground

https://dailpost.wordpress.com/prompts/bury/

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One of the interesting facts about Australia’s monoliths is that they are small above ground, with the bulk buried below. This is a partial shot of Kokerbin Rock that I took 2009. The rock is between the communities of Kellerberrin and Shackleton. Kokerbin Rock is 122 mtrs high, and is a grantire formation. Originally it was an indigenous birthing site, and therefore a women only site. As you approach Kokerbin from the east it even looks like a pregnant woman lying on her back.

Kokerbin is the third largest monolith in Australia, but what you see with teh eye is small compared to what geophysics has uncovered as buried below ground. Mt. Wudddina in South Australia is second largest, and the iconic Uluru is first.

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Uluru in 2014, and again, the bulk of it is buried or underground. And this is also a significant Indigenous site, and while it is a popular tourist destination it continues to be used, whereas Kokerbin is no longer used and is now a nature park.

pvcann.com

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