Tag Archives: species

We Can Too!

Potential – Word of the Day

Redgate Beach, south of Margaret River. The beach was closed yesterday, in fact, I couldn’t even see it. The winds were gale force earlier in the day, and still strong in the afternoon, whipping the water in to shore, and making it difficult to keep a steady hand for filming. The western shore contains a variety of examples of rock formations that have been weathered by waves, and when you see the power of the water, it is no wonder.

Water is powerful, and in many ways. Wave power as an idea, a theory, has been around for years, though one the earliest attempts is still recent – Scotland, 1991. The long history of shipping has relied on water, and has also suffered from the volatility of storms at sea. The same can be said for the fishing industry, tourism, military purpose, exploration and more. Rivers and other sources of land based water have been critical for the survival of all species. Plants and animals vary as to percentage but all have a foundational volume of water that constitutes their being. Science has variably said that water is 80% of the human body, I say variably because others say it is even higher.

Water is fundamental for survival, dehydration is deadly for any species. And water, though abused by, is also fundamental to industry and manufacturing at every level. We know the absence of water contributes to desertification, and evidence from other planets shows that lack of water equals lack of life.

The potential of water goes back to the dawn of time, and onwards to the floating gardens of the Aztecs, Roman baths and aqueducts, the farming of rice, fish farming, reticulated agriculture, and the generation of electricity (hydro-power).

With climate change as a reality, even fiction, like the post apocalyptic story of Waterworld, seems less far fetched than when it hit the cinemas in 1994. Water is seen as part of our daily survival need, but also part of our future as once again, floating gardens, floating communities, hydroponics, aquaculture, and responses to climate problems like flooding, see Practical Action    have become exciting options for ways forward.

And yet, we are far more diverse than water. The human is complex, and, beyond the primitive brain, unique in brain capacity for problem solving, design, learning, creating, conceptualising, and comprehension, to name a few potentials. We too can be a positive power in the world, veritable tsunamis of ideas, science, engineering, chemistry, the arts, and more. We too generate energy. And we have the potential to creatively solve the issues before us.

We can contribute to life, we are powerful, we can be creative, eroding and wearing down the barriers and the negatives, shaping and sustaining life and potential worlds and communities,  we too are fundamental to nature though by good or ill, depending on how we value nature. We have the potential to turn around the whole climate change issue. Like water, we have to pool, pond, and gather together to get it done. Even the formation of water, hydrogen and oxygen is a metaphor for working together to achieve an outcome. One drop of water is just one drop of water, but many drops are potential, are power, resource, possibility, together we are an ocean of potential.

The ground was hard
many seeds to be planted
neighbours helping

©Paul Cannon


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“All God’s Creatures Got A Place In The Choir”

via Daily Prompt: Creature

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Folk singer/songwriter Bill Staines wrote “All God’s Creatures Got a Place in the Choir.” I love the song because it’s theme is a plea to value all living things, all animals, insects, birds, and so on. We all have our place, and we all have purpose, and we all have true value.

The photo is of a Black Cockatoo. Of the five species of Black Cockatoos – Baudins, Carnaby’s, South-Eastern Red, and the Kangaroo Island Glossy, are all on the endagngered list. Only the Yellow Tailed is not endangered. I shouldn’t have to write that anything is on the endangered species list, let alone four of the five species of Black Cockatoo. The main threat to the birds is habitat loss. They nest in the hollows of older trees, and land clearing has deeply affected them. They are long living (50 yrs in the wild), the females lay and nurture one egg, and the chick takes up to three months before taking flight. So they’re not in a hurry nor are they prolific breeders, which makes them vulnerable.

State depts responsible for wildlife are taking action to prevent loss, and the WWF (in conjunction with Birds Australia) are working to educate and prevent loss. So it is not all bleak, but much more needs to be done. They are unique to Australia, and they are beautiful creatures in their own right.

I know the answer, but I find myself often asking “How did we ever let it get to this?” We need to turn the tide everywhere of every endangered species. They’re all in the choir!

A Place In The Choir

Paul,

pvcann.com

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