Tag Archives: rain

Just Five More Minutes

Loath – Word of the Day

IMG_0134.jpg

Rain on the Blackwood.

Just Five More Minutes

Rain spattering our roof,
rivulets
gutters gurgling
as the torrent sluices
down, down,
and further down the doona I snuggle.
The thunder of downpipes,
quiet slick on the glass,
the soft patter of drops on leaves,
such a beautiful sound.
mmmm
What?
Tea?
mmmm
an elbow finds my ribs.
Please?
But it’s warm in here.
To no avail,
as the reply comes,
it’s your turn.
An inward sigh,
I’m loath to breach the doona
and face the cold.
Just five more minutes …

©Paul Cannon

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

29 Comments

Filed under life, nature, poetry

Patina Of July

Woebegone – Word of the Day

IMG_0143.jpg

The Blackwood River, winter is here.

 

July

July,
you camped at my window.
The constant patter of your tears
blurring, intangible,
drawing me to uncertanity.

Yearning,
longing,
the ache of melancholy,
grey clouds,
heavy laden.

Tears born of sadness,
become streams of redemption.
Washed earth
melting,
becoming.

July,
I opened my window
and bathed in your wellspring.
You drank my darkness,
I swallowed your love.

©Paul Cannon

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

15 Comments

Filed under life, love, nature, poetry, seasons

Take Courage

Exposure – Word of the DayIMG_0134.jpg

Augusta, the town jetty, and Blackwood River rising.

Fortunately we had raincoats and we knew the rain was coming, but nonetheless, with the wind whipping the rain along, and the cold air pressing in, we felt more than a little exposed. But, because we were prepared we enjoyed the walk. The tide was very high as predicted by the Weather Bureau. There was also a lot of flow from up-river after three major rain bearing fronts have been through and local flooding was expected. You can’t tell from the photo but the timber decking of the jetty looked as if it was floating as the water was touching the underside. We haven’t seen it like that for a while.

Weather exposure can be very serious, hypothermia or sunstroke, the risks are great if you’re not prepared. Preparation means covering up, sunblock, hats, raincoats, warm clothes, appropriate footwear. So that whatever the weather we put on what is necessary to be comfortable and to protect ourselves. However, we know not to wear winter gear in summer and vice versa, and usually we’re good at that.

We’re not so good with emotional exposure. We’re trained, or we train ourselves, to overprotect, and sometimes we wear the wrong emotional gear, like using the mask of happiness to cover depression, or the mask of confidence to cover fear. Rarely do we let others in, we become invulnerable, strong, a veritable fortress. Yet the best possible way forward, the only true way to wholeness is to trust others with our inner world. Of course, it goes without saying, you don’t grab a megaphone and announce your life to the world, but there are people in our lives we can talk to, take off our masks, and be vulnerable with.

As Brene Brown has said many times, in our society vulnerablity, to be exposed, is to be seen as weak. Brown counters this with “vulnerability is our greatest measure of courage.” Brown defines vulnerability as “uncertainty, risk and emotional exposure.” It is an opening of the self to another, whereby empathy becomes the healing counterpoint or the supportive staging point, depending on what we are going through. Brown’s research is thorough, and in it she discovered that every courageous act was underpinned by vulnerability. That tells me that we can only really flourish when we are able to speak our truth and take off our masks and be real with others, then we are whole and not just pieces or segments. The fortress life may serve us well but to really floursih we need to let the drawbridge down from time to time, otherwise we not only defend ourselves against the outsider, we imprison ourselves from the world. I’d rather be open than be a captive! Take courage.

cherry tree winter bare
cold has stunted many new buds
the wild branch has fruit

©Paul Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

 

 

 

 

 

18 Comments

Filed under Haiku, life, mindfulness, nature, psychology, quote, self-development

Unscheduled Schedule

Serendipity – Word of the Day

 

20171228_085231209_iOS.jpg

Sarge Bay, Augusta, storm coming in.

Chaos Theory would say that for every apparent moment of chaos there’s an underlying pattern. Science would say that serendipity is logically explainable. Calvinists would err towards a predestination, others destiny and fate. Some confuse it with spontenaity, perhaps serendipity is spontenaity but I think it is something different, for me serendipity has no particular agency.

Storms come and go, they appear random, we know that for every element of nature there is an action, reaction process, there is an explanation. Storms appear because they are a reaction to pressure fronts meeting, here it is usually cold front meets warm front, winds and rains ensue. A reliable pattern attested to by the weather reports. But perhaps the timing, the position, the intensity are more random.

When we lived on the farm, we would often look out across the valley and watch a rainbearing front coming in from the west, it would drop maybe 1 – 2 inches on our place, yet a property down the road might be dry – nothing. The next time we might get nothing and the property down the road might get 1 – 2 inches. Rain is patchy at best, never consistent across a front. Rain may be patterned by the pressure system, but within that pattern there are random moments where rain doesn’t fall equally, where the wind squalls vary, where hail is inconsistent. A normal abnormality! Thunder and lightning would be another example.

Storms aside, love is perhaps the greatest example. Not withstanding hormones, the what, who and when of love are serendipitous. Love, true love, is interrupted planning, disrupted expectation, blindsided hope, deranged logic.

“When love becomes logical, it dies. When affection is timed, it no longer exists. When bliss is scheduled, no after-thought can bring it back. Now is the only time for serendipity, for synchronicity, for joy.” (Amy Larson/AmyJalepeno.com) All the romcoms, TV shows like Friends, are testimony to serendipity, that the best laid plans all come undone every time, and the unplanned becomes the real. Perhaps love itself is serendipity. I like to think so.

“She was forever unexpected and I was drunk on that about her.” Atticus Finch in ‘To Kill A Mocking Bird.’ (Harper Lee)

snow covers the ground
stark are the barren branches
one blossom smiling

©Paul Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

4 Comments

Filed under beach, bush walking, Country, environment, Haiku, life, love, mindfulness, nature, quote

Rivulet of Hope

via Daily Prompt: Rivulet

Scan.jpg

Every year the creeks would dry up, the rains would cease, summer would arrive, the heat would brown the paddocks and turn the soil to hardpan. As summer streched into pseudo summer, the early part of autumn, we’d be craving the rains. The damns would be low, the pools down the creek almost gone, and the land crying in thirst.

But then the rains came, slowly, a shower here and there. And then the heavens would open, and down it would come. Some days after the water had prepared its own path, soaking into the creek beds, the soil would take no more and, at first a rivulet of water would appear, then a trickle, and then a flow, and the granite would shine, wet and glossy, the cascade decked with white froth. The sound of running water, a sound that brings joy, relief nd new life fills our ears. Soon the frogs would be calling.

Nature’s like that, it gives what is needed, it takes what is needed.

The economy is a whole other world. Conservative politicians the world over talk of ‘trickle down’ economics. Give the money to the rich and it will eventually trickle down to the poor. It never has, it never will. The economy, unlike nature, takes and takes and keeps on taking and only gives back to the rich and those in power.

I my view, an economy that is based on sharing, taking only what is needed and also giving back is a balanced one, but one that ensures there are less cracks to fall through, less barriers to surmount for the poor, more opportunity for all. A shared economy has to bid farewell to greed and selfishness, and requires a change of heart towards consumption. The dog-eat-dog cycle we’re in is doomed and the world cries out for releif and justice. But we are the change that needs to happen.

For my part that requires an ever growing awareness of others needs both near and far. It requires an awareness of my responsibility in my love affair with nature. It requires that I give back in generous ways. It requires that I model the economy I beleive in by not consuming the very lives of others. If everyone dropped a pebble in a pond it would cease to be, but if everyone took a breath and backed off from supporting the madness of consumption we’d make a dent. Of course, realistically, the other thing we need to do is exercise our vote with discretion towards those goals. And then the trickle will flow and become a stream, a river, a torrent of justice, a rivulet of hope.

The late Brazilian archbishop Helder Camara, an advocate for the poor, especially the slum dwellers, named it when he said: “When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist.”

We still need to ask why!

politicians lie
money will not trickle down
let love flow instead

©Paul Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

 

24 Comments

Filed under Economics, Farm, Haiku, history, life, mindfulness, nature, politics, quote, Uncategorized

Rush

via Daily Prompt: Rush

IMG_0087.jpg

I took this photo when Jon and I went to Bluff Knoll a couple of years ago. It was raining towards the top, and given the the sides of the mount were almost vertical in long sections, the rain rushed, hurtled down in streams. I love the sound of rushing water, it is something I’ve liked since I was a child, and this day was no different, it was a real treat. The other experience, inevitable really, was that we got soaked, and I didn’t mind that either. When I was a kid I’d run around without my raincoat on and rejoice in the rain. To play on the word rush, I got a rush out of the rain, and out of the rushing water.

Over the years I’ve experienced a rush in different ways, the usual suspects, drugs, alcohol, sugars, speed, abseiling, sport, travelling, bush walking, and the list goes on. It took time to learn to simply enjoy the moment, to attend to the experience as it was without seeking after it. It took time too, to emmerse in the experience without just consuming it. Of course it was partly learning and maturing, but it was also learning to let go and to deepen in the experience. There is something about experiencing a rush, a peak moment, to reach the pinnacle, but to do so without rushing it because the quality is richer and lasting. Not everything has to be immediate.

Who could forget the clasic Aesop fable ‘The Tortoise and the Hare” where the hare presumes to beat the slow moving tortiose, and yet through over-confidence and arrogance loses. Aesop simply making an observation about life, it’s how we are when we don’t immerse and attend.

I love this quote from Tolstoy: “The two most powerful warriors are patience and time.” and Rousseau: “Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.” The reverse is also true.

Paul,

pvcann.com

15 Comments

Filed under bush walking, Country, life, mindfulness, nature, Spirituality

Not Torn

via Daily Prompt: Torn

IMG_1261.jpg

Looks like torn or pulled meat. Eucalyptus bark is never torn though, it falls from the tree like streamers, usually in autumn, but some in winter too. The bough is then freshly exposed, glossy, youthful skin shining in the sun, and another cycle begins, the growing, hardening, and then the shedding all over again. This littered pathway covered several hundred metres, and it was a joy to walk, natures carpet strewn to welcome walkers, welcomed me. The rain had softened the bark and leaves, so it wasn’t crunchy like it would be on a dry day. It welcomes others too, there were many insects, spiders, and beetles to be seen on the edges of the path. Later the birds will take what they can for nesting. And this bark is nature’s mulch, giving seedlings a start in life. It’s amazing what you can see when you really look closely. Awareness and attending are the true way to walk life.

Paul,

pvcann.com

4 Comments

Filed under bush walking, life, nature, Spirituality

Percussive

via Daily Prompt: Percussive

20150702_202042.jpg

We were waiting to make a dash for the car. It had been raining all afternoon, and now into the night. The rain was percussive, it was pinging off the metal of the car bodies, drumming on the bitumen, splashing in the puddles, and sounding like a rivet gun on the awning where stood. I love rain, it’s a sign of life, hope for life to come. Rain is refreshing, like petrichor, the smell ofrain on summer scorched earth. When I was a kid, I loved running around in the rain. I still don’t mind bush walking in the rain.

I love the sound of rain too, that percussion on a tin roof! I find gentle rain quite comforting, it’s like natures mantra.

And the song always comes to mind: ‘I Can See Clearly Now The Rain Has Gone.’ It’s like the rain somehow intervenes in my life, it overwhelms my senses, enables me to refocus. In some way, rain helps me to be more vulnerable, but most especially in the bush.

Paul,

pvcann.com

4 Comments

Filed under cars, life, music, nature