Tag Archives: mature

Scale Model

Squabble – Word of the Day

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Innocent little things, not so long ago they were in the incubator, now they’re happily fosicking around the yard together, but soon they’ll squabble and fight over scraps, worms, seeds and more. Like any young, they learn to play and fight, and they learn to negotiate life’s maze. Squabbling is petty, but part of living, and as we mature we have opportunity to learn from such behaviour, what is important and what we can let go. If we don’t we may sadly remain petulant, enmeshed in anger, jealousy, or bitterness and miss out on the joys of life and relationship. Squabbles are an opportunity for children to learn to work it out rather than escalating into something intractable.

Pity there isn’t much in the way of leadership at national and international level by way of example. We seem to have a gaggle of immature, petulant politicians. But the same could be said for some in the celebrity circus (although the line is now blurred between civic and celebrity), or the sporting world. Sad how the back yard or the school yard squabble has found a place on the international stage.

But then that is not so strange, if the model at home is no better then why should we be surprised by public displays of such behaviour by adults? Unless I take steps to resolve or even prevent squabbles in my own life then what right do I have to whinge about the behaviour of politicians and celebrities? None. As Gandhi said: “Be the change you want to see in the world.” He also said: “Whenever you are confronted with an opponent, conquer him/her with love.” And of course, love invokes forgiveness, the serum, the antidote to squabbles of any kind.

More serum in the world please!

ivy chokes the tree
the cherry blossom smiles
the pink heart of love

©Paul Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Galahs Partake

via Daily Prompt: Partake

It begins with one, two, then three, then more. They gather to partake in the most joyous fun together. It was raining the other day and we were sitting on the veranda watching the day go by, when nature’s jesters turned up. The ubiquitous Pink & Grey Galah, found almost everywhere in Australia. They love to play, and they love to play in the rain (when it’s warm weather that is). This group started with one then there were more. I love it when they hang upside down to get the full feel of the rain and get a wash. You can hear from there calls that they are having a ball. It’s a little like watching young children have fun together.

The Pink and Grey Galah or Eolophus rosiecapillus (although science is also saying Cacatua rosiecapillus) a cockatoo, is common across Australia. Its common name is derived from its colour – pink with grey. Our English word Galah is taken from the Aboriginal language Yuwaalaraay and their word Gilaa. Galahs form strong bonds as couples who mate for life, and they are known to become depressed if their mate dies. There is an urban myth that if one of the couple dies, the other remains celibate, but it has been proven that they do indeed find another mate. They can live up to thirty years in the wild. They are highly inteligent, social, and adaptable.

In Australia the word Galah has also been used as a euphemism for someone who is a loud mouth. In teaching meditation, the term for a distracted and busy mind was always a monkey mind, but I use the word Galah mind, it makes more sense when you have no monkeys.

But their playfulness reminded me of how humans generally lose their sense of play, we become too serious and dismiss play as childish, silly, immature or a waste of time. We crush the inner child at every turn with our grown up ways. Dr. Stuart Brown gives us a great way to look at play as important to our health and development.

Like the Galahs, we too need to hang loose ocassionally, we need to play in the rain, we need to partake of fun. And like the Galahs who grieve their dead mate, we grieve so many things in our lives, and there is a place for counter-balance, not as distraction, but as intentional. Brown talks about how we need play to be whole and healthy, how doing the most, what appears to be silly things, enable us to see life differently. In other presentations, Brown provided research of prison inmates whose childhood had been deprived of play, there is a correlation between play deprivation and development issues. Some sobering thoughts, but ones that affirm the need to play.

Sometimes we need to be life’s jesters, and make like a Galah (the bird, not the loud mouth).

Paul,

pvcann.com

 

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Copper Sails

Patina

Patina is a liberated word, it used to be restricted to the effects of oxidation on metals and stone, now it covers just about everything. But my eyes were drawn to the copper sails that help define the Perth Bell Tower.

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If you look closely you can see the oxidation, the patina, of the copper tiles that form the sail. A few years ago the Orthodox commuity decided to clean the patina on the copper dome of their church in North Perth. Once it was done it gleamed like a lighthouse beacon whenever light hit it, it was stunning. But I think the patina on the Bell Tower is somehow more fitting, it sets those ancient bells from England in a mature, historical ambience. Besides I like patina and rust, which is perhaps a reflection on my parallel process of aging, there’s quite a bit of the patina of life that’s clung to me, and I’m conscious of the rust, the things that are not what they were, not gone, but different, maturing and wonderful in their own way.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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