Tag Archives: life

Ormiston Gorge

via Daily Prompt: Gorge

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A popular tourist stop along the West MacDonnell Ranges is Ormiston Gorge, probably because it is the most accessible water hole to visit along the route. It was also the largest body of water out of all the gorges we visited, the bird-life was vast, and there were fish as well. Ormiston is picturesque and very attractive, and is an oasis in a rugged landscape. I find it very restful when wilderness travelling to encounter a gorge or a creek, something about water and life, a sense of security maybe, but more than that pleasure and hope. The rich texture and the colour of the ancient rock, and the bush around, is a contrast to the sand and water. The water is restful on the eyes and ever cooling. The bird calls a sign of life and future, there is new life birthing here. And our friends the trees ever breathing for us. A beautiful experience to be treasured. A veritable feast to gorge our eyes on the gorge before us.

Paul,

pvcann.com

 

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Copper Sails

Patina

Patina is a liberated word, it used to be restricted to the effects of oxidation on metals and stone, now it covers just about everything. But my eyes were drawn to the copper sails that help define the Perth Bell Tower.

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If you look closely you can see the oxidation, the patina, of the copper tiles that form the sail. A few years ago the Orthodox commuity decided to clean the patina on the copper dome of their church in North Perth. Once it was done it gleamed like a lighthouse beacon whenever light hit it, it was stunning. But I think the patina on the Bell Tower is somehow more fitting, it sets those ancient bells from England in a mature, historical ambience. Besides I like patina and rust, which is perhaps a reflection on my parallel process of aging, there’s quite a bit of the patina of life that’s clung to me, and I’m conscious of the rust, the things that are not what they were, not gone, but different, maturing and wonderful in their own way.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Knit

via Daily Prompt: Knit

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Moss and wood a marriage of sorts,  knit together in a lasting, mutual, relationship. The wood is dead, yet it gives life, while the moss is life and forms a wonderful eco network. It had just rained and petrichor was working my nostrils yet again, and the peaty smells were heavy in the air. Not only that, they give pleasure to the eye, and the touch of a hand. Eros and Psyche are perhaps lingering up ahead …

Paul,

pvcann.com

 

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Experimental

via Photo Challenge: Experimental

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I love Experiemntal art, in all media forms. This is an acrylic piece I did five years ago using texture and thickness of the medium to add effect. It’s title is ‘Life’

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Faint

via Daily Prompt: Faint

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There we were at Uluru, and in a part I hadn’t been to previously some years ago. There was, and not uncommonly, an overhang or shelter in the rock, and on the surface of the shelter there was this faint art work, which is ancient. I just cannot remember the meaning of this particular piece (others will remind me), but in every way it holds a significance and beauty I cannot put into words – you had to be there to experience it. What moves is the age, the simplicity (in my perception), the depth of meaning behind the simplicity, and just the simple fact that here I was, in 2017, close to this work which was ancient. Who had communicated this, what was it like, what did it say about them. However, the author of this work would probably ask no such questions. For me it was faint and faded but precious. And a faint call that turned to a roar,  of something about relationship, otherness, community, and life through time. Life in presence, attention and awareness. Strange how something faint, something beyond my experience, could be so profound and powerful.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under art, Country, history, life, Philosophy/Theology, Spirituality, Uluru 17

Panacea

via Daily Prompt: Panacea

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Photo from – unusedwords.com

Many years ago I knew someone who was working hard to get a hospice in the city of Perth. They and others achieved that aim, and now there are several facilities offering hospice care around the metro. Hospice care is for when there is nothing more that can be done for an ill person. It is holistic in that it covers more than just patient care and medication. It is all about reaching out to the family of the dying person (so that children are included and so that pets can also be included). And in regard to the person dying it offers spiritual guidance (which can be independent of a religious affiliation); social worker help; volunteers to sit with the person, allowing family to take time out; pain management, and general care.

I’ve had cause to visit people in hospice over the years. It is hard to accept death, but even more so for those who are family and close friends. Often they desire a miracle, a cure, something, a magic pill. I guess we’d all like a panacea that offers a comfortable exit.

But in my experience there is an alarming avoidance of pain to the point that death is sanitised. Now I’m not wedded to any view of assisted dying (euthanasia) or opposed to it in principle, but assisted dying is an avoidance of pain, perhaps a fear of pain. A common statement I hear often is “I’m not afraid of dying, but …. I don’t want to end in pain.” But who does?

I need to tread carefully here, but there is something about how pain is part of our journey as humans. This life is not a constant pleasure ride. Yet we desire to be rid of it, to avoid it, to never have pain. I’m struck by people who live with all sorts of pain, Maximillian Kolbe the Polish priest who gave his life in place of a young Jewish husband and father that this man might have life. Martin Luther King Jnr. who knew that death and discomfort was a real risk; the many people I have been privileged to journey with through terminal ilness and dying. Pain cannot be romanticised, nor should it be glorified, but yet it must be faced. Elisabeth Kubler Ross in her groundbreaking work of 1969, wrote passionately about dying and grieving.

Two things she has said:

“The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths. these persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity, and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, and a deep loving concern. Beautiful people do not just happen.”

“Should you shield the canyons from the windstorms you would never see the true beauty of their carvings.”

Hospice is no panacea, it simply manages pain, among other aspects of life and death. Somehow I believe that we shouldn’t rush to end pain, not so that we can build character or grow, but so that we can face ourselves, our body, and all that goes with pain and death. And maybe we’ll overcome our fear of pain if we face up to it, and take a different route. In some ways, I’d like to see my carvings, my beautiful scars and know them. So don’t search for a panacea for me, just sit with me when the time comes, and rejoice in the beauty of the carvings of my life.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Elasticity

via Daily Prompt: Elastic

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This remnant of fallen bough lying in a paddock for maybe thirty years, termites, borers, slaters, ants, wind, frost, rain, and sun, all taking their toll on this piece of wood. Once alive and elastic, now reduced to a core, the juice of life gone. Earth to earth …. elastic no more, yet in its own way, giving back, enabling elasticity in the soil through nutrients and fiber. Not bouncing back but giving life.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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