Tag Archives: inner child

Inner Child – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

What Do You See?

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Inner Child

It took some time to set you free,
I searched for the key,
but it was so long ago I
forgot it was at my very center;
my blindness hid you,
then I forgot you,
I shrank and dried up,
ever diminishing,
till one day
I stumbled on a clue,
love,
self,
which released you,
running, grinning, bouncing, leaping,
thirsting for life.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

Paul, pvcann.com

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Filed under creativity, Free Verse, life, mindfulness, poem

Play Is Serious Business!

 

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Play, you know, the thing we do when everything else is achieved! This painting (used by Dr. Stuart Brown in his TEDx Talk featured in my post Galahs Partake ) by Pieter Brueghel the Elder, 1501, is entitled “Children’s Games” but if you look closely, not all of the characters are children, in fact there are many adults also at play. Brown asks what has happened to our society that such scenes are no longer part of our life style.

Brown believes that the root of losing play in our society is guilt. We have been well trained in our society to respect hard work at the cost of all else.

In the early 20th century the sociologist and philosopher Max Weber published his work “The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit Of Capitalism.” This work explores the link between work, religious belief and capitalism. Weber’s work was well received, and was commonly called “The Protestant Work Ethic.” Weber lays the responsibility for the drivenness towards capital and work at the door of the Calvinists who held that play was trivial, even ungodly (this from the same funsters who banned musical instruments in churches in the sixteenth century, and influenced the practice of locking up public playgrounds on Sundays). Sadly, this work ethic caught on, and capitalism blossomed in a particular way, a symbiotic relationship, that in my view is destructive on every level.

The result has been an ever demanding economy in which we consume as we are being consumed, body mind and soul, so long as we remain ignorant of the dilemma.

In a more mindful way we need to get in touch with our inner child, to be free to be creative in our own way and not to be drawn into perfectionist behaviours of fun. To be free to leave some things incomplete (which is an acknowlegement that one day we will leave everything complete, and others will do for us what we cannot do for ourselves). In one sense play and letting go has something to give us by way of living as we are aging and preparing for death, the ultimate letting go.

In the short term, play enables us, releases us, heps us reframe and is just plain healthy. We learn more about ourselves and others in play.

That old saying is true: “All work and no play makes Jack/Jill a dull person.” The painting by Brueghel is a reminder that adults used to have fun in simple ways, and perhaps, life was less dull.

In a confronting way, the Benedictine Sr. Joan Chittister once recalled that when she was grumbling about cleaning floors while she could have been studying for her degree, the superior commented “You have all the time there is.” We all have time. Play must be a priority, it must be intentional. Go play 🙂

For an MP3 of Krista Tippett, at On Being,  interviewing Stuart Brown for “Play, Spirit, and Character” (2007) go to Dr. Stuart Brown

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under community, creativity, life, mindfulness, quote, self-development, Spirituality

Evocative Experiences

via Daily Prompt: Evoke

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Definitely not appropriate now. Burning coal we know to be destructive to the atmosphere. Even early on in the industrial revolution smog was noted in English cities as coal was fundamental to machinery for transport, and manufacture, and it filled the air, polluting the atmosphere. I’m glad for other forms of fuel to supplant coal. It would be good to have a solar train! But, nonetheless, I love old steam trains (some would say addicted to them), they evoke strong feelings in me. My childhood comes to life again as I remember family outings, trips to far off cities, going trainspotting with my dad, going to a soccer match with my dad and his friends. The sound of the trains, which ran close by our home, the smell of the coal fire, the whistle at the level crossing, are marvelous memories. It was like they were alive, hence the term iron horse, or mechanical beast, equating life to them. Steam lives on through my inner child as it comes to the fore, with train trips, scale modelling, and museum visits, treasured memories are evoked and very welcome. For me, a steam train is a key to my past, an experience of joy, and a treasure-chest of rich memories, they are evocative of special times.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under history, life, Trains

Disobey

Disobey

Disobey is my middle name. I wasn’t born to follow inane laws and trifling regualtions. I was born for love, passion, and creativity. I hated the institution of school, yet I really loved learning. So I bunked off, or as we say here, I wagged most of my upper school. Mental health days too were importnat in my early work life. I wasn’t keen on the institution of the church either (which is deeply ironic), but I subverted that at every turn and still do when opportunity arises to be creative with it. I couldn’t tolerate School Army Cadets, I couldn’t take it seriously and they were glad when I left. I did love Scouts, but hated the constrained process, I lasted the longest there and learned a lot, but in the end I left because I really couldn’t sing national anthems or dib, dib as we were supposed to say. My mother was always horrified that I would break rules in general ( I still do) like parking the wrong way round or worse, much worse (a tale for another time). Street racing in Perth in 70s, such fun! Life is not monochromatic, it is not cookie cutter sameness, it is not doormat living, or institutional slavery. Life is authenticity, honouring the inner being, the inner child too, and our creative bent. Just be, and if that means disobeying from time to time, then do, it’s good for the soul.

Paul

pvcann.com

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