Tag Archives: epiphany

Time Will Tell

Epiphany – Word of the Day

 

Gillian Welch: Time the Revelator

Aha!

That’s my simple explanation to anyone who wants to understand an epiphany, the moment something is revealed, when the penny drops or the dots are connected. The classic reference is, of course to the series of revelations of Jesus as Messiah in the gospel, and hence the liturgical season of Epiphany to celebrate these revelations.

It was taken and used in literature as personal revelation in matters from the mundane to the profound. The mystic Julian of Norwich, who wrote her “Revelations of Divine Love” in 1395 (reputedly the first known published work by a woman) reveals a series of spiritual epiphanies, perhaps the most often quoted being: “All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of thing shall be well.” A profound awareness.

James Joyce polularised the term in his autobiographical work Stephen Hero and in Portrait of the Arrtist as a Young Man, in which he would refer to times when he’d had a deep realisation, or when something manifested more clearly to him.

I really like how Gillian Welch plays with the idea of time as a revelator (see video), as the giver of epiphany, how living and engaging, reflecting and looking back, helps make sense of change and life now. Whereas for Dylan God is the revelator and judge, for Welch Time is. For Welch, time will tell!

I think my first epiphany was that I was part of the fabric of the universe. I freaked my parents out when I was four, I was regularly caught sitting on the window ledge of the second story window where my bedroom was. But I couldn’t help it, the moon and the stars captivated me and held me prisoner in wonderment. Going backwards, I later discovered the world when a maternal uncle gave me a large world wall map to gaze on and realised there was so much that constituted life. And incidentally, I think that order of learning has deeply affected me, because I go to the universe first and the world second.

More recently epiphany is related to my meditation and the contemplative. I never cease to be amazed, even by dew drops on grass! And I’m strangely warmed and satisfied by that.

The whole point of epiphany is that it comes to you, you can’t make it, but you can facilitate it – simply by taking time, time to observe, to engage, to listen, to feel, to receive, to attend.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under life, Literature, meditation, mindfulness, music, Spirituality

There I Am

Epiphany – Word of the Day

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(Image: imgc.allpostersimages.com)

And There I am

Despite the warmth, there’s still dew
my shoes wet
hurriedly marching
briefcase my conscience
notifications bleeping
a car alarm sounds far away
I don’t really care.
My mind a kaleidoscope of
of another day,
like a magnet drawing me ever onwards.
Caffeine,
Sweet sister caffeine,
please, just one.
The park blurs
hands full
still marching
I clip the curb
dramatic eclipse
change on the ground
stopping, retrieving.
Time ceases.
There’s still dew,
lush verdant blades,
light.
A diamond?
A diamond!
All is still, not even a wisp of breath.
The air hangs like velvet,
the grass like feathers.
A tiny drop, perfect, a mirror
of all.
And there I am,
I touch the fabric of the universe,
and there I am.

©Paul Cannon

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My Meander

via Daily Prompt: Meander

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The Warren River meanders for only 137 kms from its orign at the Tone and Perup Rivers near Manjimup and Pemberton, and down to the Southern Ocean, but it is one of the beautiful rivers of the south west. This photo is from Moon’s Crossing, near the public campsite, the last of the mist is still palpable, the glassy water a beautiful, reflective mirror. So peaceful, so inspiring.

Author, among many succesful charisms, Toni Morrison once said: “All water has a perfect memory and is forever trying to get back to where it was.”

The great (well I think he was great) poet TS Eliot wrote in his work ‘Little Gidding’ “We shall not cease from exploration. And the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.”

Neither is talking just about geography. They are addressing the inner life. Neither is being ironic, nor negative, or limited in their thinking. The yearning to return to the place we began is not to go backwards, but rather to appreciate in greater depth the journey to self. Such a journey is one of self discovery, the opening of the heart, even to pain and disappointment, the discovery of limitation, love and also otherness, to appreciate beauty in all forms, to know passion, to know oneness.

As we meander through life we do, at times, inwardly yearn to make sense of it all, even in the present moment. Eliot captures this briliantly. We return to where we began, but with new eyes, new insight. Because we cannot leave ourselves, we can only see with new eyes, experiences on the journey are all about arriving at self but with a completely new view framed and underpinned by our experiences. Which Proust famously pointed out when he said: “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.” By which he meant new inner eyes. I am who I am, but the journey opens me to the possibility of new insights and discoveries of self which enable growth and change. My new horizons come from how I engage with life, love, nature, realtionships, disappoinments, passion, and find fulfilment in expression as I continue to meander through each day. It is then I know something new about myself or some experience, some feeling, for the first time. That moment of epiphany is potent, difficult to articulate, and at times overwhelming in its beauty, as much as its formative pain.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under bush walking, Country, environment, life, mindfulness, nature, Spirituality