Tag Archives: change

Inside Job

Possibility – Word of the Day

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I know the owner of this beautifully restored Morris “Woody.” When he bought it he could see what it would look like fully restored. He did much of the work himself, but outsourced to a friend the work he wasn’t skilled at doing. It was old and tired when he bought it, and once the old faded paint was stripped off, the upholstery, timber frame, wiring and more, were all refurbished, it looked as good as new. Michael could see the possibility of beauty and life, where few could.

Some of us have been around a while, a little over thirty. I’m not a great advocate of exterior renovation, but if that’s your thing, then go for it. I’m more for the interior renovation. I see possibilities in myself for change, for challenge, for renewal. And in my experience, when I actually engage with these interior processes, difficult as some may well be, the outcome is not only that I am different because I have grown, or moved in some way or direction, my view of others and of the world has shifted too. And what I do for myself affects those around me. Not only that, but if we persist and achieve some interior change, others may be encouraged, not just becase we have changed, because they can se ehope for their own journey.

But the question is, do we see impossibilities or possibilities in ourselves? Do we see beauty and life?

“They did not know it was impossible, so they did it.” Mark Twain

“When you have exhausted all possibilities, remember this, you haven’t.” Thomas Eddison

my heart yearns to change
a storm is raging in me
the pond is still

©Paul Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

22 Comments

Filed under cars, creativity, Haiku, life, mindfulness, quote

Love is Infectious

via Daily Prompt: Infect

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My love walking the beach.

When we fall in love there is a chemical cocktail that is released into the body, literally infecting us with those feelings we call love.

Being attracted to another stimulates the body. If you feel elated, over-the-moon, energised, then dopamine has been released in your system. It works for other forms of elation too, winning a prize, gambling, sport, and drugs. Dopamine is the pleasure chemical.

Intimacy, closeness, bonding, means that oxytocin is in your system. Oxytocin is released when it gets physical, all that hugging, holding, kissing, touching, staring into each other’s eyes. Oxytocin calms and eneables intimacy and bonding. Sigh.

If sex is on the menu, then testosterone is in the system of both sexes. Testosterone is higher in males, and higher in male saliva, it is believed that kissing increases desire in both partners. Sex increases testosterone in the system.

Pheromones, those chemical messengers, also play a role in love, our noses are key to how we interact with others.

These chemicals work at the intense falling in love/sexual leel, but they are also released in long term relationships. They also impact in the four types of love, so that family, sibling, pet, and friendship also include feelings of love as these chemicals are released.

They’re the things I want to be infected with, the things of love, the elation, the focus, the bonding, the intimacy, belonging, joy, and the energy. Imagine if that infected the world!

The Beatles sang “All You Need Is Love” it was considered a trite song by many, and way too idealistic, and maybe that’s so, but there’s nothing wrong with poetic aspiration. I really liked then, Iand I like it now. And I beleive that love is all we need to change ourselves, and therefore, in turn, to change the world. It doesn’t seem that difficult.

Paul,

pvcann.com

28 Comments

Filed under chemicals, community, life, love, mindfulness, psychology, self-development, Sex

3 Day Quote Challenge – Day Three

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Viktor E. Frankl, neurologist, psychiatrist, author, holocaust survivor. Frankl was the founder of  Logotherapy (Existential analysis). Frankl, a keen observer of human behaviour, and especially his own (much of his reflection came out of the camp life) wrote:

“When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves.”

I love this quote because it is so encouraging, we are not disempowered by circumstance or situation, only by our own refusal to engage with change. Frankl had to adapt rapidly to the life in the SS camps. First he was sent to Theresienstadt Ghetto in (the then) Czechoslovakia. He was later moved to Auschwitz in Poland, and then to Kaufering (a satelite of Dachau), and then to the labour camp at Dachau in Germany. He worked in camp clinics to help give fellow prisoners mental health tools for survival, and he helped newcomers get over the shock. thus, challenge to change was in his own experience.

Again, thank you for the nomination Soul Write Empire

Rules:

Thank the nominating blogger.

Post three quotes (one per day)

Nominate three bloggers each day, today’s nominations:

sumiswu8

Rohit Sahu

A Voice From Iran

Paul,

pvcann.com

26 Comments

Filed under life, mindfulness, psychology, quote, self-development, Therapy

3 Day Quote Challenge – Day 1

Margaret Mead

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One of the many inspiring things Margaret Mead observed and commented on was about the capacity of small groups to change the world. She said:

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

I don’t know about you, but that last line is wonderful and hopeful, and that really speaks to me.

 

Thanks for the nomination to the challenge from Soul Write Empire

Rules for nomination:

Thank the nominating blogger

Post three quotes (one per day)

Nominate three bloggers each day.

My nominations are:

Crazartt

Nasuko Japan

Tracy Muso

Paul,

pvcann.com

18 Comments

Filed under life, mindfulness, politics, quote

Rivulet of Hope

via Daily Prompt: Rivulet

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Every year the creeks would dry up, the rains would cease, summer would arrive, the heat would brown the paddocks and turn the soil to hardpan. As summer streched into pseudo summer, the early part of autumn, we’d be craving the rains. The damns would be low, the pools down the creek almost gone, and the land crying in thirst.

But then the rains came, slowly, a shower here and there. And then the heavens would open, and down it would come. Some days after the water had prepared its own path, soaking into the creek beds, the soil would take no more and, at first a rivulet of water would appear, then a trickle, and then a flow, and the granite would shine, wet and glossy, the cascade decked with white froth. The sound of running water, a sound that brings joy, relief nd new life fills our ears. Soon the frogs would be calling.

Nature’s like that, it gives what is needed, it takes what is needed.

The economy is a whole other world. Conservative politicians the world over talk of ‘trickle down’ economics. Give the money to the rich and it will eventually trickle down to the poor. It never has, it never will. The economy, unlike nature, takes and takes and keeps on taking and only gives back to the rich and those in power.

I my view, an economy that is based on sharing, taking only what is needed and also giving back is a balanced one, but one that ensures there are less cracks to fall through, less barriers to surmount for the poor, more opportunity for all. A shared economy has to bid farewell to greed and selfishness, and requires a change of heart towards consumption. The dog-eat-dog cycle we’re in is doomed and the world cries out for releif and justice. But we are the change that needs to happen.

For my part that requires an ever growing awareness of others needs both near and far. It requires an awareness of my responsibility in my love affair with nature. It requires that I give back in generous ways. It requires that I model the economy I beleive in by not consuming the very lives of others. If everyone dropped a pebble in a pond it would cease to be, but if everyone took a breath and backed off from supporting the madness of consumption we’d make a dent. Of course, realistically, the other thing we need to do is exercise our vote with discretion towards those goals. And then the trickle will flow and become a stream, a river, a torrent of justice, a rivulet of hope.

The late Brazilian archbishop Helder Camara, an advocate for the poor, especially the slum dwellers, named it when he said: “When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist.”

We still need to ask why!

politicians lie
money will not trickle down
let love flow instead

©Paul Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

 

24 Comments

Filed under Economics, Farm, Haiku, history, life, mindfulness, nature, politics, quote, Uncategorized

Disrupt Yourself

via Daily Prompt: Disrupt

There’s a whole movement out there that began a few years ago. Some names you may be familiar with are Jay Samit or Whitney Johnson, their TEDx Talks are well known in business circles. These talks on disrupting yourself are mostly applied in the context of marketing, designing, entrepreneurship, or general business leadership. Kate Canales, another TEDx presenter, does give another slant (and with good humour too), that the change we bring to our lives is indicative of potential in all areas of our lives.

Disrupting ourselves is not simple, we are creatures of habit. Who enjoys change? (Well, actually I do, mostly) Most people find they enjoy routines and patterns, I must confess I find many routines deadening. Though it is true to say, no one could sustain unrelenting change, that would equate to chaos, nihilism. Research shows we used to enjoy set television viewing patterns, now we choose online, delay or download. Work used to revolve around set timetables. Study was a regime or intent. Some of these things have been disrupted as technology has changed how we work and study, and whether we watch Netflix or still hire DVDs or watch TV. Over Fifty years there has been a dramatic shift in values and expectations, rights, and social behaviour. Point is, we are often forced to change, we rarely choose to change. The point Canales is making is, we will be presented with opportunities of all sorts for innovation and change, but what will we do?

Canales and others are simply trying to encourage us to look at ourselves and to be prepared to take those chances and risks that are at our core – our passions, driving force, creativity, desire, gift, and go for it. Must we wait for change to be forced?

When we disrupt ourselves, we break patterns and routines, past mind maps and the like, we set ourselves free. A sobering quote I’ve loved for years says it well: “A rut is a grave with the ends kicked out.” (attributed to Earl Nightingale) Life is to be embraced, engaged, and lived into in all the mess we are and all the potential we offer. When was the last tine you made a change in your life?

But perhaps disruption and change are not what they seem anyway. Carl Jung said: “In all chaos there is a cosmos, in all disorder a secret order.” This was popularised through Chaos Theory, that all disorder has an explanation. And isn’t that why we say, “It was meant to be” when strange or unplanned things happen, recognising that there is indeed something ordered even in disruptions, changes, or chaos? Isn’t that why we say “It’s a crazy world” recognising we don’t have complete power over everything? If there is no default control switch, no default pattern, what are you waiting for?? Disrupt yourself and set a new course.

Paul,

pvcann.com

 

 

14 Comments

Filed under creativity, life, mindfulness, Philosophy/Theology, quote, self-development

Letting Go

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I think planning can be helpful, even important, but I also believe that it is just as important to let go of the plan especially when it’s not working, but also when life calls us down a slightly diferent road.

I loved reading Joseph Campbell, he had deep insight, and he once said:

“We must be willing to let go of the life we planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.”

Which is similar to John Lennon’s well known comment: “Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans.” Good to plan, not so good to be too rigid about it. Good to have direction, so long as you’re willing to modify or change as needed. Sometimes we can’t see, don’t realise, for any number of reasons, that plans get us going, but we need to allow for points of departure. And yet, strangely enough, looking back, the twists and turns, the points of departure look something like a plan that was meant to be all along. Sometimes we need to attend to those deep inner shifts in us that disturb our moods and thoughts, feelings that twinge, and attend to where life is calling us.

Paul,

pvcann.com

14 Comments

Filed under life, mindfulness, psychology, self-development, Spirituality

Constant Change

via Daily Prompt: Constant

 

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Heraclitus, a self taught and independent philosopher, once said: “Change is the only constant.”

He also said: “… you cannot step twice into the same stream.”

Simple, but true. However we often talk as if life is unchanging and permanent, yet everything, including ourselves, is changing. Life forms age, the universe is ever expanding (as Edwin Hubble was able to prove), planets are ever changing. Nothing is permanent.

Some people are uncomfortable with change, ironically it is a force of life. Change is about growth, transformation, adaptation, and without change we would lack spark. we would be lacking the very thing that can help ignite us. Change for the sake of change is never productive or positve, but change we attend to, are mindful of, will be part of our next step, our core energy.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under life, Philosophy/Theology

Entertain the Other

Entertain

Two movies I find deeply engaging are Chocolat and Babette’s Feast. They are not the same and yet they have some similarities in that relationships and love win out. In Chocolat Vianne fights the attitude of a whole town in France that is locked into a puritanical observation of the ancient privations of Lent. Vianne wins the people, and eventually her main detractors, by showing interest in the people, by offering hospitality, entertaining them, showing them love, most especially the unloved and rejected. Vianne is a soul friend, a confidant, a counsellor, a change agent.

I particularly love the dinner scene because it shows some of the people joining together and enjoying a sumptuous feast, they love its flavour, texture, its combinations, it is a scene not of lust, but of joy, true unadulterated joy, a setting free. And that is Chocolat, it is a series of people being set free. In the end Vianne herself is set free of her own struggle, dealing with the unresolved grief of her mother’s death. You can access the movie as just a whimsical jaunt, but you can go deeper and access the idea that entertaining the other, attending to the other, actually changes the world, one relationship at a time.

Paul,

pvcann.com

32 Comments

Filed under community, food, life, Spirituality

Meddle (Pink Floyd)

via Daily Prompt: Meddle

I haven’t played this for a while, but I love this track. ‘Fearless’ is track three on the sixth Pink Floyd album called ‘Meddle’ which was released in 1971. As all the musicphiles will tell you, ‘Meddle’ was the defining moment for Pink Floyd, where they left the psychodelia and Barrett era and moved into a progressive rock with Gilmore and Waters. ‘Meddle’ is also significant because it is a colaboration of the whole band in terms of songwriting. Many cite this album as foundational in the new direction that made Floyd and prepared the ground for ‘Dark Side of the Moon’ and therfore defining in terms of sound and style. It was well received in the UK and Holland, but moderately elsewhere. Later it became a classic with fans and is now viewed as one their most important albums.

I’m sure it’s foundational, and there are echoes (no pun intended) all the way to the last album. However, I just love it as it is. And perhaps it is a twist on the title, that the band meddled with their own direction and sound. It certainly was an intervention in their style at that time, and it was a shift in direction, and for me and many others, a welcome intervention in my life.

pvcann.com

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