Category Archives: Mythology

You Lie – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

What Do You See?

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You Lie

You want me
to lie down with you
in that watery grave.
but you lie to me of
such voluptuary,
with naked invitation
and I am so tempted
save for the deafness of steel,
this wall between your song
and my uncertainty.
For now
I’m content to savour your gifts
and I shall dream of you more,
tonight.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

 

Paul,  pvcann.com

26 Comments

Filed under boats, life, love, Mythology, poem

Vain Search – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

Quest – Word of the Day

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Graphic: fanpop.com

 

Vain Search

The stone will only yield
what was forged in Avalon,
to the one fated of Pendragon,
a precursor to
the vain search for the grail,
a road of bones
and Guinevere’s hand,
who is only
to be shared round a table,
knights ignoble,
courting disaster,
washed in mead,
drifting through Camelot,
confused,
I look up as the bus arrives
at the city terminus,
and so my quest begins,
mobile in hand,
wrested from telco,
a precursor to
today’s vain search for purpose.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

 

Paul, pvcann.com

29 Comments

Filed under Free Verse, life, Mythology, poem

There Were More

Three – RDP Saturday

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Photo: midsouthhiking.com

The Festival of the Three has a long history, but carries many historical discrepancies. There are three gifts given by the Magi to Mary on behalf of Jesus, but the number of gifts doesn’t indicate the actual number of wise people. There is no mention of camels in the story. They weren’t kings either, but Magi or the cream of the wise in any realm –  were astronomers, geographers, metallurgists, healers, etc.

 

There Were More

Wittgenstein, Jung, Curie, and Bohr
walked into Bethlehem,
and kicked some dust around,
eventually getting to some house,
where an unwed mother waxed lyrical about her child,
who smiled beatifically,
at the wise ones,
and asked;
why four?
and why no camels?
Perplexed, Jung replied that
greeting cards created expectations,
a kind of make up your own story,
but there were no camels,
and there were more than three,
though finding wise ones was problematic.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

 

Paul, pvcann.com

 

34 Comments

Filed under Alt-Religion, Free Verse, life, Mythology, poem, religion

Under The Lunacy Moon – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

Lunacy – Word of the Day

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Photo: pexels.com

My mother, and many others, often used that phrase, “It must be a full moon tonight” to explain various odd behaviours which seemed to occur around a full moon. There are lots of urban myths and tall tales, along with superstition, associated with a full moon. In Europe in the Middle Ages the belief persisted in the “lunar lunacy effect” or “Transylvania effect” where at a full moon humans could change/transmogrify into werewolves or vampires. Luna was the the Roman goddess of the moon, and Luna forms the prefix for the word lunatic.

Shakespeare wrote: “It is the very error of the moon. She comes more near the earth than she was wont. And makes men mad.” Othello

 

Under The Lunacy Moon

Just a little transmogrify,
I’m feeling pleasantly odd,
a little unhinged,
it’s electric,
I’m wild,
please, let me bite you,
a taste so sweet;
my veins are boiling,
let’s run through the streets,
sing anthems and rhymes,
climb a mountain
and howl a rabid canine tune.
Just this one night,
together,
under the lunacy moon.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

62 Comments

Filed under astronomy, Free Verse, Mythology, poem

Oracle of Love

Enigmatic – Word of the Day

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John Collier’s ‘The Delphic Oracle’ (1891) The Delphic Oracle were priestesses highly valued, who offered divination at the temples, including that of Apollo in the locale of Phocis at the foot of the south slope of Mt. Parnassos, in Greece. The Oracle would sit on a tripod over a fissure in the floor where vapours arose which induced trance and utterance.

 

Oracle of Love

There you sat,
midst the herbs and vapours,
in the place that caused you to sway and swoon,
to speak in ecstatic utterance,
bending your tongue in language unknown,
contorting, writhing,
while unveiling ancient truths,
as you divined that enigma of Delphi,
the oracle, that spoke of our undying love.
It was there you held me
priestess of love,
and I was overcome.

©Paul Vincent

 

Paul Cannon,

pvcann.com

18 Comments

Filed under art, life, love, Mythology, religion

The Dragon

Enthralling – Word of the Day

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Last week we spent a couple of days on the wildflower run, and at Leda Reserve, apart from the stunning array of flowers I was enthralled with this gem as well, a gargoyle perched on a rock – can you see it too? This one was clearly sent to protect Leda.

 

The Dragon

La Gargouille, terror of Rouen,
you lost your head When Romanus made the sign,
and now you sit in judgement of your kin,
though, instead of fire, you spout water,
La Gargouille, protector of Rouen.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

 

 

Note: Gargoyles date back to ancient Egypt, but the term gargoyle comes from the dragon slaying story of c. 600 AD where the priest Romanus captures the Dragon –  La Gargouille, which was terrorising the town of Rouen, and the villagers cut off its head and burn it at the stake. However the head wouldn’t burn, so instead they place Gargouille’s head on the church to ward off evil and warn other dragons to stay away.

Paul,

pvcann.com

31 Comments

Filed under bush walking, Country, Five Lines, history, Mythology, poetry

That First One

Mentor – Word of the Day

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Mentor: In Homer’s epic “Odyssey” Mentor was the trusted friend of Odysseus, and during the the time that Odysseus was away fighting in the Trojan war, Mentor cared for Odysseus’ son Telemachus. Mentor’s role was to prepare Telemachus for leadership of the family. And so we use the term today to describe someone who takes us under their wing so that they can help and guide us in matters of life and study and work. See also, Mentor

That First One

There’s always that first one,
perhaps you remember?
That kiss,
caress,
crossing the line,
warm with excitement.
Intimacies that temporarily quench desire,
but are not love.
Rather, they are a course woven through desire,
a learning of love,
of how to be love,
to be a lover.
That first one is our guide,
a gift of loved learning.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

14 Comments

Filed under life, Link, love, mindfulness, Mythology, poetry

Celebration

Unexpected – Word of the Day

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Image: http://www.pexels.com

 

Celebration

One summer’s dusk
we lay down in Demeter’s realm,
whispering wheat in gentle breeze,
fecund, abundant and lush,
a promise of tomorrow.
And there momentarily we lived abandon,
that little death let go,
when, suddenly,
so unexpected,
a kaleidoscope of butterflies
filled the air.

 

©Paul vincent Cannon

 

Note: a kaleidoscope is a group of butterflies, and Demeter was the Greek goddess of grain and harvest.

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

26 Comments

Filed under bush walking, Country, life, love, Mythology, poetry, Quadrille, romance, Sex

Pure Folly

Piffle – Word of the Day

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The Folly was an 18th century English/French idea where a piece of architecture was built simply to decorate a garden or a field. While in Ireland some were used as a way of providing employment, in England they were mostly an indulgence of the wealthy. Many were replicas of the seven constructed wonders, famous castles, and other architecture. Some served a purpose, like a pavilion, but many were in fact, just decorative. There are, in my mind, plenty of modern equivalents.

 

Pure Folly

There you stand,
once as grand as Troy.
Now your weathered alabaster
and marble refinements are greyed,
pock marked, amd worn.
Your rondels as if ravens had plucked their eyes,
the adorning orb no longer shines
yet the sun has not set on you.
You look tired
ravaged by nature from whence you came.
Even so, you stand defiant
lasting testimony to decadence past,
a vision of something grand,
or, perhaps, a flight of fantasy.
As I ascend your steps to the heavens,
I hear the crowd roar and the clash of shields,
the Trojans quake,
O Helen.
Such folly in a folly.

©Paul Cannon

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

31 Comments

Filed under history, Mythology, poetry

Perseus

Constellation – Word of the Day

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Perseus

Son of Zeus and Danae,
sacker of cities, warrior,
hero by heart,
White Tiger of the West.
When Danae was threatened
you feted Polydectes with the head of Medusa,
that Gorgon.
And later, long before Heracles,
you rescued Andromeda from Cetus.
Many are your deeds,
and, though Homer was tight lipped,
at least Ptolemy gave you a place
after you had gone to the nothern skies.
There your light so shines,
a constellation of hope,
keeping company with your beloved,
keeping watch,
incorruptible,
lover of good.

©Paul Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

18 Comments

Filed under astronomy, history, Mythology, poetry, Space