Category Archives: meditation

An Uncommon Quiet

Burgeon – Word of the Day

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Lake Brown, near Nungarin.

An Uncommon Quiet

My peace is layered,
as silence expands into silence,
and my mind,
untroubled in this eden,
sits down to a quietude uncommon
most of the time.
But here it comes quickly,
and with a joy that is worth possessing
at great price,
though it cannot be bought,
only breathed,
embodied,
lived.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

24 Comments

Filed under bush walking, Free Verse, meditation, nature, poem

Speaking Silence – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

Discovery – 5 Lines

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Photo: pexels.com

 

Speaking Silence

It took a while, a circuit or three,
but I discovered that silence is not the silence I thought it was,
for silence speaks a language of other,
a knowing not knowing that speaks for itself,
arriving and arriving and arriving.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

26 Comments

Filed under Five Lines, Free Verse, meditation, poem, poetry

Voices In The Glade

Glade – Word of the Day

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One of my many photos of Borannup forest, the glade is just in front.

 

Voices In The Glade

So profound was my experience that day,
when I entered that glade,
and felt the place.
There I surrendered my adopted
sophisticated self,
returning to my true child,
dazzled by delights so simple,
humble, natural, and beautiful.
How could it be that the honeyeater,
a dew drop, that dry leaf, the spider,
a skink or two,
a rock,
could change the very core of me?
This I know,
I left that glade
knowing there was more than I,
an intricate flow of life
that spoke to me,
and, overcome,
without words
my soul ran over.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

17 Comments

Filed under bush walking, Country, environment, Forest, life, meditation, mindfulness, nature, poetry

The Parenthesis Of Silence

Pithy – Word of the Day

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Photo: pexels.com

 

The Parenthesis Of Silence

To put away the day for just a moment,
and turn down the volume of my mind,
let alone every device of distraction,
to accept the seasons,
the songs of life,
and, the love of others,
to simply sit
with folded hands
in silence.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

45 Comments

Filed under life, meditation, mindfulness, nature, poetry, Quadrille

Heavenly

Candor – Word of the Day

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Photo: jpinfo.com

 

Heavenly

I heard your footsteps pressing down
on surrendered cypress,
barely,
above the water singing over rocks,
gently seeking home,
just visiting this humble onsen.

I saw you emerge,
floating through the Hinoki,
its resin so sweet,
an offering in praise of your being.
Heavenly,
Cherry blossom pink.

A ritual unfolds.
A pause,
a prayer,
as kimono softens the rock.
Your body supple as a young Sika,
graces the intimacy of water.

An open conversation
I hear with my eyes.
And, though my lips silently babble,
my heart speaks straight,
as my ritual unfolds.
A prayer …

©Paul Cannon

 

The Latin allows for candor to carry the meaning of brilliance, whiteness, radiance, naturalness and much more.

An Onsen is a hot spring, but has also come to include the bath house alongside. A Sika is a Japanese deer which is also a species common across Asia. Hinoki is a small cypress tree.

Paul,

pvcann.com

26 Comments

Filed under life, love, meditation, nature, poetry, romance, Spirituality

Hasten Naught

5 Lines

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Image found on videoblocks.com

 

 

Hasten Naught

Hasten naught,
the chain is in the doing,
constriction like a vice.
Release is in the juice,
of how I stay and sip my tea.

©Paul Cannon

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

9 Comments

Filed under life, meditation, mindfulness, poetry

Seasons Out Of Time

RDP#52-Time

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Savoir Vivre

Arabica claims my soul,
and I fold into myself.
Nursing, caressing ceramic,
contours of the mind explored,
a joie de vivre.

Pleasure fills and shutters me,
with a kind disregard for all.
Shuffling The Daily, scraping chairs,
pling and clicking banished,
My visa is for mellow ground.

Grief, a presence felt, “How was that?”
But how could I explain?
Ambrosia? Words inadequate.
A meditation slowly unfolding.
“Perfect.” I said.

The spell now broken I come ashore,
leaving kairos, chronos pulling
its quotients ever draining.
But I,
I prefer seasons out of time.

©Paul Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

16 Comments

Filed under life, meditation, mindfulness, poetry, seasons, Spirituality

Into The Mystical

Mystical – Word of the Day

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The Blackwood River, Augusta, looking north east, one of my mystical places.

Mysticism comes from thε Greek root of μυω, which means to conceal. Mysticism crosses every religious boundary and belief system. That which is mystical is hidden. In the great debates about God from a Christian point of view there is the mystic view that God is both knowable and unknowable at the same time, that as such, there are elements of God that are visible, definable, but that mostly, God is concealed and unknowable.

Many have pursued mystical experiences. Aliester Crowley (1875 – 1947) was one of the most famous occultists of the twentieth century, trying to make connection with a world beyond. Carlos Castaneda trained as a shaman and explored mescalin using peyote as a mystical experience, inspired by the Toltec. Timothy Leary went with the synthetic drug LSD. There are trance groups, fasting practices, musical experiences, ritual practices and more. True tantra, like Tibetan Tantra, was only ever a form of meditative practice whereby the delay of orgasm and the control of orgasm is said to increase ecstatic experience, but for the purpose of prayer and meditation (and should not be confused with “Californian tantra” as I call it, or with Hindu left hand practices). Kabbalah originated as a Jewish mysticism, but now has non-Jewish paths as well. A number of celebrities have dabbled in Kabbala from Elizabeth Taylor to Madonna.

In the third and fourth centuries Christian men and women from Israel, Jordan, Asia Minor, Egypt and North Africa went in droves into the deserts to develop a communal and contemplative life. And from John Cassian to Theresa of Avilla, to Thomas Merton, a few Christians became mystics, seeking the unknowable God.

I think the unknowable attracts, and we pursue it, partly to make it known, to unravel the mystery, to bring the hidden into full view, in the main, to experience what is concealed. Most of the writings of mystics that I have read reaffirm that God, Other, the divine, is unknowable, but that in the journey of mysticism, there is connection, ecstasy, love, wholeness, union and more.

For me any sense of the divine comes more through nature and the contemplative. The photograph shows a familiar walking space I take in, some days it is beautiful, some days it just is, but always it evokes a sense of mystery, of the divine in some way. There is something about certain places that does that for me. Uluru, Kata Tjuta, Elachbutting Rock, Boranup Forest, and more, are places that move me deeply, places where I sense an otherness beyond myself or other people. I have felt ecstasy in these places, I have been overcome with joy, they can be erotic (in the pure, emotive sense) experiences, I have experienced deep inner stillness, and sometimes a confusion of feelings rushing in all at once. Such things tell me I am more open in these spaces, yet I also know that my openness is also because I sense something more. This for me is the mystical.

As Van Morrison wrote in his song “Into the Mystic” – “Let your soul and spirit fly into the mystic.”

I stand in silence
mystical nature envelops
the heron smiles

©Paul Cannon

Van Morrison “Into The Mystic”

 

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

26 Comments

Filed under Alt-Religion, bush walking, Country, Haiku, life, meditation, mindfulness, music, Philosophy/Theology, quote, religion, Spirituality

Time Will Tell

Epiphany – Word of the Day

 

Gillian Welch: Time the Revelator

Aha!

That’s my simple explanation to anyone who wants to understand an epiphany, the moment something is revealed, when the penny drops or the dots are connected. The classic reference is, of course to the series of revelations of Jesus as Messiah in the gospel, and hence the liturgical season of Epiphany to celebrate these revelations.

It was taken and used in literature as personal revelation in matters from the mundane to the profound. The mystic Julian of Norwich, who wrote her “Revelations of Divine Love” in 1395 (reputedly the first known published work by a woman) reveals a series of spiritual epiphanies, perhaps the most often quoted being: “All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of thing shall be well.” A profound awareness.

James Joyce polularised the term in his autobiographical work Stephen Hero and in Portrait of the Arrtist as a Young Man, in which he would refer to times when he’d had a deep realisation, or when something manifested more clearly to him.

I really like how Gillian Welch plays with the idea of time as a revelator (see video), as the giver of epiphany, how living and engaging, reflecting and looking back, helps make sense of change and life now. Whereas for Dylan God is the revelator and judge, for Welch Time is. For Welch, time will tell!

I think my first epiphany was that I was part of the fabric of the universe. I freaked my parents out when I was four, I was regularly caught sitting on the window ledge of the second story window where my bedroom was. But I couldn’t help it, the moon and the stars captivated me and held me prisoner in wonderment. Going backwards, I later discovered the world when a maternal uncle gave me a large world wall map to gaze on and realised there was so much that constituted life. And incidentally, I think that order of learning has deeply affected me, because I go to the universe first and the world second.

More recently epiphany is related to my meditation and the contemplative. I never cease to be amazed, even by dew drops on grass! And I’m strangely warmed and satisfied by that.

The whole point of epiphany is that it comes to you, you can’t make it, but you can facilitate it – simply by taking time, time to observe, to engage, to listen, to feel, to receive, to attend.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under life, Literature, meditation, mindfulness, music, Spirituality

Paperbark Writer

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The paperbarks (Melaleuca – one of the 300 Myrtaceae family) are shedding a little later this year. Another theme of winter is shedding. Some animals shed a summer coat in order to prepare for winter, many plants shed their blooms and slow down in some part, some of our birds fly elsewhere for the winter though we get visitors from other shores. We, perhaps, can live unaware of our own needs. What do we need to shed in order to prepare? Mind you, the converse is also something that we need to attend to, what do we need to gather in, soak up, put on in order to prepare? Self care and nurture are fundamental to well being, body mind and soul. For me the continuity of writing and meditation are part of that nurture. How about you?

“In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer.” Albert Camus

Paul,

pvcann.com

32 Comments

Filed under bush walking, environment, life, meditation, music, nature, quote, seasons