Category Archives: history

Elegance With Age

via Daily Prompt: Elegance

IMG_0511.jpg

The British vintage car and mortorcycle show in Canberra (2016), a lot of the usual types, Austins, Rovers, Minis, Rolls, a Norton Comando, and a Triumph or two. All beuatifully restored and good on the eye. But then there was this, a roadster, and I forgot to note what it was exactly, my memory says Jaguar. But what I see is elegance, which is not something I would normally say about a mechanical object, but this one is smooth and sleek, a mechanical beauty, that draws me.

Paul,

pvcann.com

12 Comments

Filed under cars, history

Copper Sails

Patina

Patina is a liberated word, it used to be restricted to the effects of oxidation on metals and stone, now it covers just about everything. But my eyes were drawn to the copper sails that help define the Perth Bell Tower.

20130930_113855.jpg

If you look closely you can see the oxidation, the patina, of the copper tiles that form the sail. A few years ago the Orthodox commuity decided to clean the patina on the copper dome of their church in North Perth. Once it was done it gleamed like a lighthouse beacon whenever light hit it, it was stunning. But I think the patina on the Bell Tower is somehow more fitting, it sets those ancient bells from England in a mature, historical ambience. Besides I like patina and rust, which is perhaps a reflection on my parallel process of aging, there’s quite a bit of the patina of life that’s clung to me, and I’m conscious of the rust, the things that are not what they were, not gone, but different, maturing and wonderful in their own way.

Paul,

pvcann.com

8 Comments

Filed under art, history, life, nature

Dubious

Dubious

IMG_2533.jpg

I don’t know about you, but this old ute is a dubious form of transport, I doubt it would get very far.  But, in its day it worked hard and in harsh conditions. It resides in the Gwalia Museum near Leonora, a testimony to the tenacity of the those who worked the district in a era of primitive machinery compared to today. Dubious, but grand. And I wonder the stories it could tell.

Paul,

pvcann.com

6 Comments

Filed under Country, history, life

Faint

via Daily Prompt: Faint

IMG_2877.JPG

There we were at Uluru, and in a part I hadn’t been to previously some years ago. There was, and not uncommonly, an overhang or shelter in the rock, and on the surface of the shelter there was this faint art work, which is ancient. I just cannot remember the meaning of this particular piece (others will remind me), but in every way it holds a significance and beauty I cannot put into words – you had to be there to experience it. What moves is the age, the simplicity (in my perception), the depth of meaning behind the simplicity, and just the simple fact that here I was, in 2017, close to this work which was ancient. Who had communicated this, what was it like, what did it say about them. However, the author of this work would probably ask no such questions. For me it was faint and faded but precious. And a faint call that turned to a roar,  of something about relationship, otherness, community, and life through time. Life in presence, attention and awareness. Strange how something faint, something beyond my experience, could be so profound and powerful.

Paul,

pvcann.com

Leave a comment

Filed under art, Country, history, life, Philosophy/Theology, Spirituality, Uluru 17

Orange Revolution

via Daily Prompt: Orange

ORANGE REVOLUTION.jpg

Nothing much happens here, we might wake up to find the reigning political party have dumped the prime minister (Rudd-Gillard-Rudd, or Abbott-Turnbull) or that we’ve been signed up for yet another military venture supporting our allies. I still remember the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, we avidly listened to the radio every night, half expecting history to be made with a people’s uprising throughout China. Which was ironic, because it was already called The People’s Republic of China. The protest was bold and powerful, and even though there was no popular uprising, it sent a message to the world.

But the one that sticks in my mind is the one I know the least about. The Orange Revolution in the Ukraine in 2004. I know that the protests resulted from reports of fraud in the 2004 presidential election between candidates Viktor Yushchenko and Viktor Yanukovych.  Yanukovych was declared winner, but fraud became evident. Daily protests and a general strike forced the authorities to offer a second round of voting. After which the clear winner was Yushchenko. What I remember of it was the colour, the protestors wore orange, or carried orange flags and baloons, and hence it became known as the Orange revolution. Notably, it was a peaceful revolution (despite the fact that the president had attempted to engage the army in reigning in the protestors, which the army refused to do). Of course there’s a lot more to it than that, the histories of Russia, Poland and Ukraine are in the mix of this, the preceding years of government, public attitudes, the division between west and east (more pro-Russian) Ukraine, the murder of Georgiy Gongadze – a vocal anti-corruption journalist, and more. It was an amazing moment in time.

Paul,

pvcann.com

2 Comments

Filed under history, politics