Category Archives: environment

The Question – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

Upside Down – VJs Weekly Challenge

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Photo: pixabay.com

 

The Question

I saw a question
on the side of the road,
a struggling plant,
gasping, calling for water,
and none to be found,
save for the discarded plastic bottle
of nature’s spring water,
resolutely shut,
lying nearby,
self-absorbed,
and totally unaware
of the gift it withholds,
selfishly smug,
secure in its expense.
Will the plastic ever care,
now that it has so cleverly seduced us
and shut us against our very own life?

©Paul Vincent Cannon

Paul, pvcann.com

26 Comments

Filed under environment, Free Verse, life, nature, poem

Wonderment – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

Wonder – Word of the Day

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Photo: unsplash.com

 

Wonderment

Two parts multiverse
with stars hung just right,
a creek of no distinction
which, nonetheless fascinates with songs of abandon,
along with dappled forest light which invites
as sunlight plays with leaves,
whereas thunder speaks of power beyond ourselves,
and leaves us in awe;
such wonderment in which to delight and more
as we open ourselves to  nature
and a love that is our share.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

 

Paul, pvcann.com

15 Comments

Filed under environment, Free Verse, life, poem

Disordered In Fact – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

Seasonal – 5 Lines

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Photo: unsplash.com

 

Disordered In Fact

We agreed on this much,
that the seasons were changing, disordered in fact,
more snow, more rain, more heat than before,
new seasons were evolving,
but, out of fear, we chose ignorance over facts.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

 

Paul, pvcann.com

26 Comments

Filed under environment, Five Lines, Free Verse, life, nature, poem, seasons

Moment Of Truth – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

Conviction – Word of the Day

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Photo: http://www.usnews.com

 

Moment Of Truth

The gavel goes down,
all rise comes the cry,
shuffling and scraping we ascend,
till the judge once seated,
approves our descent.
Now in session,
we move to our fate,
a judgement,
guilty or not?
The defendant is humanity
surely a term redundant?
denial its only ploy.
The prosecution calls witness,
from far and wide,
from the Amazon, Syria, Andromeda,
and further afield.
Particles and life forms,
all speak their truth,
of neglect, abuse and slaughter.
The jury goes out,
the jury comes in,
and the grim word of guilty leaps out,
the judge summing up,
points the finger,
and sternly convicts;
humanity has failed all of nature.
Now some are rich yet many are poor,
we cannot breathe the air,
we cannot drink the water,
we have wasted the gift,
there’s not much left to destroy,
and now, quickly, we must make amends.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

13 Comments

Filed under environment, Free Verse, life, poem

Southern Aurora Belle

Scintillating – Word of the Day

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Taken some time ago when I regularly visited the town of Esperance, the sun setting in the west, and dazzling the water and my lens with its light.

Southern Aurora Belle

At the telescope once, someone mused,
“Why is it so dark out there?”
“Well,” said I, knowingly,
“There’s simply less reflective matter, and
besides, most sources are many light years away.”
When you entered that crowded room,
dazzling, you lit up the whole place, an aurora,
but your smile was just for me.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

18 Comments

Filed under bush walking, Country, environment, love, nature, poetry, Science, Space

Voices In The Glade

Glade – Word of the Day

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One of my many photos of Borannup forest, the glade is just in front.

 

Voices In The Glade

So profound was my experience that day,
when I entered that glade,
and felt the place.
There I surrendered my adopted
sophisticated self,
returning to my true child,
dazzled by delights so simple,
humble, natural, and beautiful.
How could it be that the honeyeater,
a dew drop, that dry leaf, the spider,
a skink or two,
a rock,
could change the very core of me?
This I know,
I left that glade
knowing there was more than I,
an intricate flow of life
that spoke to me,
and, overcome,
without words
my soul ran over.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

17 Comments

Filed under bush walking, Country, environment, Forest, life, meditation, mindfulness, nature, poetry

The Clock Has Tocked

Exemplary – Word of the Day

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Rachel Carson (1907 – 64) (Photo: post-gazette.com) Carson was a marine scientist whose most known public work was “Silent Spring” (1962), a clarion call for humanity to address their impact on nature. In particular, Silent Spring is an investigation into pesticides. Carson wrote: “They should not be called “insecticides” but “biocides.” Rachel Carson, Silent Spring, p. 189.

“We stand now where two roads diverge. But unlike the roads in Robert Frost’s familiar poem , they are not equally fair. The road we have long been travelling is deceptively easy, a smooth superhighway on which we progress with great speed, but at its end lies disaster. The other fork of the road – the one less travelled by – offers our last, our only chance to reach a destination that assures the preservation of the earth.” Rachel Carson, Silent Spring p. 277.

Carson was an exemplar of both environmental awareness and activism as a scientist and writer.

 

The Clock Has Tocked

The old grandfather clock in the hallway is ticking,
but there’s no one to note the passing of the hour,
they’re everywhere else in this big old house,
in rooms of self,
halls of bustle,
where the carpets are dusty and threadbare,
the varnish no longer present to the wood,
and the paint so sallow.
Things should have been fixed long ago,
but our will wasn’t urgent to the task.
Grandad’s monocle popped when the quotes came in,
and we gave up,
preferring the pleasured, anaesthetised life.
Had we ventured to the hallway,
and listened closely,
we’d have known that the clock had tocked its last.
The eleventh hour cried to us,
but we mocked its melodrama,
and bargained that Chronos would let us slide,
and all the while our house is falling,
falling down upon us.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

28 Comments

Filed under chemicals, environment, history, life, Link, mindfulness, nature, poetry, quote, Science

Wetland Blues

Riparian – Word of the Day

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Locally known as the Big Swamp, which is a misnomer because it is not a swamp, it is a wetland in the true sense. I believe that in our Australian context the use of the word swamp is government/developer code for waste land – you can guess why. But to call it a wetland is to honour it and which of course leads to its protection. This a true riparian juncture between creeks and wetlands, and a wonderful ecosystem.

Wetland Blues

I had a thirst like no other I’d had
so I went to the bar and asked for a drink.
“What’ll it be?” the bartender asked.
“Whiskey”I replied.
“What mixer?” he enquired.
“O just give me some strychnine.” I said
and his jaw hit the ground with a, like,
that’s weird, are you completely mad
ain’t gonna happen kinda look.
“Just joking mate.” I laughed.
His eyebrows were question marks,
I could see, so I added –
“Well, isn’t that what we do with our water?
plastic, refuse, car bodies and waste,
we’ve filled the wetlands
and poisoned the place?
Imagine,
Rust with your sparkling sir?
Oil with your tap?
A bag with your Riesling,
wrappers with shiraz?
Or how about some soup with plastic string?”
Now we would never eat or drink that,
but I often wonder how the ducks cope
or the frogs survive,
our world is a toilet
in which we breathe and dine,
where no one can flush.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

Paul,

pvcann.com

35 Comments

Filed under bush walking, environment, life, mindfulness, nature, poetry

Tjukurpa

Harmony – Word of the Day

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Photo: Dry creek bed – the Hull River, Northern Territory. This particular spot is also the site of Kulpi Tjuntinya also called Lasseter’s Cave. The river is mostly dry on the surface, and runs underground. There are many soaks along its route. When it does rain heavily the water can be one third up the height of those trees, which given the width, is a mighty volume of water.

The Australian bush, long before white settlers, was well protected with the harmony of traditional law or Tjukurpa – pronounced Chookapah (following the Central and Western Desert peoples view). The law is an oral tradition handed on generation to generation and memorised. One of its central principles is respect for all the elements of nature because everthing is in relationship and everything has an effect. While the words harmony or balance are not explicit, the principles are evident in the way Australian indigenous peoples treat the land and each other.

 

In the Balance

Where once where trees lie salted plains
and dusty cattle ruts.
Camels, mines and 4x4s,
billabong and creek consumed.
Settlers coveted and misunderstood,
but the Anangu have wise ways,
and through their ancient dreaming,
there came ways of loving nature whole.

©Paul Cannon

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

23 Comments

Filed under bush walking, Country, environment, history, Indigenous, life, mindfulness, nature, poetry, Quadrille

Elegy

Energetic – Word of the Day

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The creek line along the outer wall of King’s Canyon.

Elegy For Mother

I stopped on the rise
where the trail opens to a valley,
and sat for a while admiring your view.
I took off my shoes and savoured your sand,
ran my hands down your powdery skin,
stretched my arms out in praise,
breathing you in,
taking you in memory,
sacred memory.
Purified in your creeks,
fuelled by your self-offering,
I reflect this on your paper,
in my electronica chic,
mineral products so smooth.
All that you are is
all that I am,
and all that I have.
Yet, though I valliantly try,
I have left you
exhausted,
depleted,
like a football I once kicked,
burst and rent.
Kyoto a faded vow,
my lust has consumed you
your energy spent
feeding mine.
And more than admiration,
or the faithlessness of plattitudes,
Mother,
Sacred Mother,
you need a hand.

©Paul Cannon

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

63 Comments

Filed under bush walking, Elegy, environment, Forest, life, mindfulness, nature, poetry, Spirituality