Category Archives: bush walking

Conversant With Nature?

via Daily Prompt: Conversant

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One of my favourite places, the main beach at Augusta, clean, pristine, and great for everyone. There are dune protection programs, a series of specified paths, signs about protecting the Sand Pipers who breed there, and also for the possums too. The State govt recently imposed a ban on plastic shopping bags, and the community are supportive of that goal. The problems are few here, mainly the threat of bushfire, or the one or two people who flout the accepted behaviour for using the beach, river, or the forest trails.

I may not be fully conversant with all things environmental science, but I do feel conversant with nature, for me there is a sentience, a relationship with all beings. The result of that sense of relationship is more than just awe for nature, I have a respect for and desire to engage with nature. The interdependent relationships we survive with and thrive on are finely balanced and require care and attention. Any loss is more than just regrettable, it is permanently damaging, and in some cases, cataclysmic. Plastic islands in the ocean, plastic sand (grains of plastic) in the Mediterranean, marine and terrestrial creatures bound or damaged by fabrics, salinity, air pollution, and more, are a major concern.

As we continue to battle human rights and have made sweeping changes in some areas of human rights, it seems that we are not yet conversant with the rights and needs of nature across the world. Time is short, and nature needs us to be conversant with its needs now and its future. The irony is, the UN are in dialogue over space law, especially the treatment of the Mars environ by the Mars One team, yet we haven’t really ironed out a binding agreement on earth that gives nature a voice of its own. Ecuador has already stepped up (in 2014) and shown the way: “We the people assume the authority to conduct and Ethics Tribunal for the Rights of Nature. We will investigate cases of environmental destruction, which violate the rights of nature.” (Prosecutor for the Earth at the first International Rights of Nature Tribunal in Quito, Ecuador, January 2014). A sign of hope.

Paul,

pvcann.com

 

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Filed under beach, bush walking, community, Country, environment, life, nature, Restorative Justice, Science

Turn To Stone

via Daily Prompt: Encrusted

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The well known Augusta water wheel, originally timber, built in the 1800s to provide water for the town and the lighthouse, now encrusted in calcite. A metaphor. If we cease to engage realtionally with others, with nature, with what matters, we risk becoming encrusted with hardness, weariness, compassion fatigue, creative dryness, and we seize up, ever hardening, never moving or growing. A heart that hardens ceases to love, and becomes encrusted with oughts (commonly referred to as a hardening of the “oughteries”), don’ts, must nots, and the bargaining of a negative mindset. What starts as protection of the self, becomes a coffin of stone that constricts. When I see that wheel, I want to chip away the calcite, to release the wheel and let it turn once again. I want to do that for those whose hearts have calcified too, but most of all I want to ensure I’m freeing my own. Only love chips away the stone of a hard heart.

Paul,

pvcann.com

 

 

 

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Filed under beach, bush walking, history, life, mindfulness, nature, Philosophy/Theology, psychology, self-development

“All God’s Creatures Got A Place In The Choir”

via Daily Prompt: Creature

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Folk singer/songwriter Bill Staines wrote “All God’s Creatures Got a Place in the Choir.” I love the song because it’s theme is a plea to value all living things, all animals, insects, birds, and so on. We all have our place, and we all have purpose, and we all have true value.

The photo is of a Black Cockatoo. Of the five species of Black Cockatoos – Baudins, Carnaby’s, South-Eastern Red, and the Kangaroo Island Glossy, are all on the endagngered list. Only the Yellow Tailed is not endangered. I shouldn’t have to write that anything is on the endangered species list, let alone four of the five species of Black Cockatoo. The main threat to the birds is habitat loss. They nest in the hollows of older trees, and land clearing has deeply affected them. They are long living (50 yrs in the wild), the females lay and nurture one egg, and the chick takes up to three months before taking flight. So they’re not in a hurry nor are they prolific breeders, which makes them vulnerable.

State depts responsible for wildlife are taking action to prevent loss, and the WWF (in conjunction with Birds Australia) are working to educate and prevent loss. So it is not all bleak, but much more needs to be done. They are unique to Australia, and they are beautiful creatures in their own right.

I know the answer, but I find myself often asking “How did we ever let it get to this?” We need to turn the tide everywhere of every endangered species. They’re all in the choir!

A Place In The Choir

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under bush walking, Country, environment, nature

Dominant Red

via Daily Prompt: Dominant

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Red soil is dominant in our center – hence the well known term Red Center. And so is Uluru in the distance. There is a connection, the sand is the breakdown of sandstone of which Uluru and many of the formations in the Center are comprised of, as well as some granite outcrops. The dominant red colour is caused by the presence of ferric iron oxides, and also certain types of organic matter, which cause the redness in both rock and sand.

The redness changes with the light, as might be expected. Dawn and sunset intensify the colour, which over an hour becomes a beautiful pallette.

I found myself singing “Red soil in the sunset” (with apologies to Nat King Cole and a horde of others who sang “Red Sails in the Sunset).

I love the colour, I find it captivating, moving, exhilarating. We all know red to be the colour for danger. I read somewhere years ago that red is the colour of action, and in ancient eastern culture red is the root chakra symbolising life and energy. Red also has the slowest wave lengths yet it is the most stimulating colour, it has that affect on me. My fave and dominant red is Shiraz 🙂

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under bush walking, life, mindfulness, Spirituality

Up Around the Bend

via Daily Prompt: Horizon

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For me the horizon is an invitation to discovery. What is up around that bend? (queue Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Up Around the Bend’) And the horizon is a metaphor for life. What comes next? It can be engaged immediately, or I can wait and savour the moment, take my time. I don’t want to conquer that bend, I just want to see what it is inviting me to, what gift is offered, and what wil I take from this moment? A little bit like my meditation practice, there is the horizon of stillness, and I wonder what that will bring to my life, what gift will arise? I’ve never been disappointed either way, and there’s always a new horizon.

“There’s a place up ahead and I’m goin’, come along, come along with me.” (John C. Fogerty)

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under bush walking, Country, meditation, nature, Spirituality

Can You Hear That?

via Photo Challenge: Silence

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Can you hear that? No? Exactly, relative silence.

Gordon Hempton and John Crossman published their book ‘One Square Inch of Silence’ back in 2009. It was an attempt to highlight the need for silence for healthy living and for the environemnt in general. It is a noise control project and has had some positive responce from commerce and industry in the US which is where the study was based. The book is a great read, and is really a biography of Hempton’s physical journey to establish if one square inch of silence could be found.

The photo is of Jindalee Breakaway, and there, there was the sound of birds, and wind, and nought else. But the search for outer silence is one thing, and can never trump the search for inner silence. My meditation teacher always said, you should be able to meditate in an airport lounge. And I laughed then, but now I know it to be true.

But the double bonus for me, as some of you know, is to meditate in the bush – this is a literal heaven. There I am nourished and truly flourish and become whole.

Paul,

pvcann.com

8 Comments

Filed under bush walking, Country, meditation, nature, Spirituality