Category Archives: art

Copper Sails

Patina

Patina is a liberated word, it used to be restricted to the effects of oxidation on metals and stone, now it covers just about everything. But my eyes were drawn to the copper sails that help define the Perth Bell Tower.

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If you look closely you can see the oxidation, the patina, of the copper tiles that form the sail. A few years ago the Orthodox commuity decided to clean the patina on the copper dome of their church in North Perth. Once it was done it gleamed like a lighthouse beacon whenever light hit it, it was stunning. But I think the patina on the Bell Tower is somehow more fitting, it sets those ancient bells from England in a mature, historical ambience. Besides I like patina and rust, which is perhaps a reflection on my parallel process of aging, there’s quite a bit of the patina of life that’s clung to me, and I’m conscious of the rust, the things that are not what they were, not gone, but different, maturing and wonderful in their own way.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Oh Mercy

via Daily Prompt: Mercy

Oh Mercy was the 26th studio album by Bob Dylan released in 1989, which seems a lifetime ago now. It was a return to moral, social and political themes following his turn to Chrisitanity and three overtly religious albums, and two mild productions. Oh Mercy carries religious and political themes but more in the usual style of the understated Dylan. For me the two significant tracks on the album are ‘Political World’ which decries any attempt to segment or compartmentalise life sealing off anything political. Dylan makes it very clear that everything is political and we are political, thus the world we live in is unavoidably poltical because we are in that world. We make it political because we are. But there is a hope for a differnt world because politics dominates and poisons our world. Thus, ‘Political World’ is a typical Dylan muse about life and a tirade against the corruption of politics.

The second track I love is ‘Most of the Time’ which a song about lost love, another Dylan genre. It is both whistful, biting and grieving in one. The rest of the album is as good.

And the title says it all. a desire to be rescued from the forces of the world over which we have seemingly little control. There are no solutions, but a deep listening and resonance with life as we know it. The solutions are in our understanding and response as we deal with life and listen deeply to our needs and purpose.

Courtesy of Youtube: Official Dylan Site – ‘Most of the Time’

 

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Filed under art, life, music, Philosophy/Theology, poetry, politics

Sludge

via Daily Prompt: Sludge

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Lake Ballard near Menzies, a salt lake now famous for the wondereful sculptures (abstract nudes) by Anthony Gormley that form an art scape across the lake. Most of the time you can walk the lake, its certainly wet underneath the salt crust, and you tramp through sludge and it sticks to your shoes and the hem of your jeans, it slows you down too, making it hard walking.  You tramp through sticky sludge all the way, but it’s worth it.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under art, bush walking, Country, nature

The Stump

What would you see in a tree stump? One where the tree had fallen in a storm, one that was in a strip of wasteland, the road verge on the edge of a rest stop on a country highway? Some people see firewood, others wood chips, a garden prop perhaps, or just a nuisance. But some see potential, some see art.

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I took this photo last week on my fortnightly trip from Bunbury to Albany. The stump sits at the northern end of the rest stop right on the intersection of Albany Highway and Martagallup Road (the way to Frankland River). I spied it the trip before but was tied up in traffic and a yearning for home. This time I made time to stop and take the pic and to admire the work. I was blown away that someone would stop here and take the trouble to produce this carving, beautifying this very ordinary space, and bringing the creative dimension to every passerby. A gift to the community. More I say.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Experimental

via Photo Challenge: Experimental

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I love Experiemntal art, in all media forms. This is an acrylic piece I did five years ago using texture and thickness of the medium to add effect. It’s title is ‘Life’

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Faint

via Daily Prompt: Faint

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There we were at Uluru, and in a part I hadn’t been to previously some years ago. There was, and not uncommonly, an overhang or shelter in the rock, and on the surface of the shelter there was this faint art work, which is ancient. I just cannot remember the meaning of this particular piece (others will remind me), but in every way it holds a significance and beauty I cannot put into words – you had to be there to experience it. What moves is the age, the simplicity (in my perception), the depth of meaning behind the simplicity, and just the simple fact that here I was, in 2017, close to this work which was ancient. Who had communicated this, what was it like, what did it say about them. However, the author of this work would probably ask no such questions. For me it was faint and faded but precious. And a faint call that turned to a roar,  of something about relationship, otherness, community, and life through time. Life in presence, attention and awareness. Strange how something faint, something beyond my experience, could be so profound and powerful.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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Filed under art, Country, history, life, Philosophy/Theology, Spirituality, Uluru 17

Surreal

via Daily Prompt: Surreal

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I always think of art, and in particular Salvador Dali, when I see the word surreal. The picture is Dali’s ‘The Persistence of Memory’ 1931 (found via Bing images) a painting of soft, melting pocket watches. Dali stated that his worls were “hand painted dream photographs.” It is arguably one of his most famous works. With surrealistic works, as with all abstract work, it is really up to the viewer to venture an interpretation. Dali never made his interpretation public. The consensus so far is that it is about decay and deterioration of time. There is light and dark symbolism as well as the theme of hard and soft. What could be more surreal? Well, sometimes my life is a little surreal.

Paul,

pvcann.com

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