The Fighter – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

At dVerse Bjorn is hosting Meeting the Bar with an invitation to write a Bref Double. Bjorn offers some fine detail so follow the link below. A Bref Double is a French quatorzain so it can fool you into thinking it might be a sonnet but it isn’t, due to the variable and various rhyme schemes. It consists of three quatrains and a couplet, fourteen lines in total. There is no meter, but the lines should be the same length. Generally a short narrative though some use lyrical form.

Photo: morzaszum at pixabay.com

“You’ll never find a better sparring partner than adversity.” Golda Meir

The Fighter

He was almost discarded,
smaller than a shoebox,
ladies size well under,
her wishes complied.

Never disregarded,
a young man stolid,
grown as an athlete,
his father took pride.

His life wasn't horrid,
defied modern medicine,
marathons of foot fleet,
but also man of thunder.

Ever shy and guarded,
a miracle of wonder.


Copyright 2022 ©Paul Vincent Cannon
All Rights Reserved ®️ 


Note: as the story goes, the doctors felt that my father might not survive post birth, he was very premature and it was suggested that he be "let go." He went on to run marathons and took up amateur boxing, winning awards in both. He was a fighter in every sense of the word.

13 Comments

Filed under Bref Double, history, life, poem, quote

13 responses to “The Fighter – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

  1. “Let go” indeed. But his parents were fighters too. In this simple bref double, so much said and unsaid. Beautifully done.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you for providing the context for the poem.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Lovely tribute to your father, Paul.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Great poem. I don’t really notice the form, as such, but I guess the equal length lines add a pithiness.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you very much, my father has never been an easy subject so it took a bit to put it out. Your comment re form resonates, I never read for form, who does? I do think the form is pithy as a result of its structure.

      Like

  5. Great to know… it is not always how you start but how you complete I think

    Like

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