Galleons Rising – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

At dVerse Bjorn is hosting Meeting the Bar with an invitation to write a poem using the form cadralor or to write a poem about the author Abdulrazak Gurnah who won the Nobel Prize in Literature.

dVerse Poets – Meeting the Bar

Image: found on http://www.pinterest.fr

“The stars, like dust, encircle me in living mists of light ….” Isaac Asimov

Galleons Rising

(1) The place of my being is so deeply wounded,
    though unrelated to what we might agree as original
    innocence of knowing, perhaps an unknowing if,
    truth be told, of all that has passed through me.

(2) What of the night darkened soul that lies behind
    my moistened eyes of longing for the white dove,
    to see the road clearly now the map has ceased,
    while clouds press inwardly to the journey.

(3) Grey winter has pleased not one of its friends,
    offering the discomfort of predictable uncertainty,
    the continuity of intermittent falling patterns
    going deep to the bones of an unframed life.

(4) The eastern shore of the lake clear yet impenetrable
    leaving the tortoise to carry its own burdens,
    those dreams of galleons rising to the stars far,
    collecting surprises along life's paradoxical way.

(5) Do you know the field of expectation's weediness,
    un-mended fences demand no sense of belonging,
    the place is riddled with interlopers of no conscience,
    time to slip away free-range, ebullient, rising.


Copyright 2021 ©Paul Vincent Cannon
All Rights Reserved ®

33 Comments

Filed under awareness, Cadralor, dreams, Free Verse, life, poem, quote, Uncategorized

33 responses to “Galleons Rising – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

  1. This is one of the most impressive of the Cadralors!!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Gillena Cox

    Being, uncertainty and belonging are cleverly juxtaposed. Well done.

    Much💜love

    Liked by 1 person

  3. And the adventure now begins:

    Liked by 1 person

  4. wow this is so raw and deeply personal … wishing you comfort in whatever form it comes! Life is always uncertain and belonging nebulous at best … take care precious

    Liked by 1 person

  5. The title, artwork, and images work into a powerful and personal cadralor! The final stanza makes me think of ineffective border between U.S. and Mexico.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. sanaarizvi

    This one deserves a standing ovation! 💝💝 Each stanza exudes such depth and poignancy.. I especially love; ” What of the night darkened soul that lies behind/ my moistened eyes of longing for the white dove.” 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. This was fantastic, and an enjoyable read 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  8. A deep and personal journey of the writer, like sharing your vision of what has and can be. The wounded being resonates until the decision to slip away free-range, ebullient, rising. I wish you a good weekend.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. A beautiful poem, Paul. It does feel very personal, but the final line is outstanding.
    Also, I love the word galleon. It makes me think of the poem The Highwayman, “The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas.”

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I love that image of galleons rising, and how you’ve presented variations on this theme throughout your stanzas. I agree with Merril: a perfect final line!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Love the movement in this, the journey, the different places, perhaps in the last stanza, I feel a restlessness, a wish to break camp. Some of us are settlers but there are also those of us who are nomads.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Uncertainty can keep us unmoored. I love your third stanza.

    Like

  13. Pingback: Galleons Rising – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon – Nelsapy

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