That Day – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

At dVerse Grace is hosting Meeting the Bar with an invitation to write about a time and, or, a place.

dVerse Poets – Meeting the Bar – Setting

Photo: avonadvocate.com the result of the Meckering Earthquake, October 14, 1968.

“An earthquake is such fun when it is over.” George Orwell

That Day

Thinking of that day,
past the cognitive dissonance 
created by voids of time since
my recollection of Hey Jude
and paisley, athletes down in
Mexico, the warmth of spring 
with a holiday sleepiness,
rattled by 6.5 that shuddered
its way into my body in a 
millisecond, before panic set in
and my mother's shriek to run
outside clear of the walls,
adrenaline better than caffeine,
fear driving hearts while news
poured in of little Meckering
pummelled to the ground,
the plaster of our ceiling
shedding dust and the 
windows crackling,
earth rumbling in waves,
shake, rattle and roll,
after-tremors wielding terror,
what can now be trusted but 
open space, in the spring of 68.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

48 Comments

Filed under awareness, Free Verse, life, nature, poem, quote

48 responses to “That Day – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

  1. Your poem is horrifyingly real …. awesome telling of chaos.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. whoa.. terror.. and well done Paul! 💖

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Great tension inside. At least we have to look on the results. Every sadness has luck inside. Michael

    Liked by 2 people

  4. That must have been quite and experience! I am sure it left your family very unsettled after it was over! Very good use of the prompt, Paul.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Shudder. What an experience that must have been, and so vividly described that it makes our own hearts pound! So well written.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Nope earthquake is never ever a fun thing. Such an horrifying experience.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Amy

    Horrrifying… It’s like tornado in part of US.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. A really scary experience that must have been. I have been to some situations and a little rumble, just scares me. You took us there with you.

    Thanks for joining in and have a good weekend.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. It must have been so frightening, leaving long lasting impressions in you.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. A very vivid description of a horrific experience, Paul. We seem to remember all the details of such an event. I still can hear the sound of a hurricane repeatedly opening an attic access door in the upstairs ceiling. My family was staying downstairs. I went upstairs to close it again and again. The wind roared like a freight train!

    Have a great weekend! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  11. I have returned as threatened — Poetry is the statement of power that sets the soul free, to be, exactly who you are — and in being just that, to introduce your truth to the world!..

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Well…a day never forgotten and won’t be forgotten.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. I have never experienced an earthquake and your poem reminds me of how lucky I am Paul. “earth rumbling in waves”. The imagery is amazing. I a. So happy you were ok. ☺️

    Liked by 2 people

  14. This poem really gave me chills 😰 I love it! So much

    Liked by 2 people

  15. I lived in California when there was a minor earthquake… but I simply overslept and heard about it in the morning after.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Pingback: That Day – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon – Click Where It Counts!

  17. I think this is real poetry. Verses around the best and the worst, the real life. Michael

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Wow, Paul! Very gripping tale. Glad you’re here!

    Liked by 2 people

  19. lync56

    Wow this took me back – you have captured the feeling and essence of that time and the experience

    >

    Liked by 1 person

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