Rising – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

VJs Weekly Challenge – Pace

Photo: theguardian.com The statue of the slave trader Edward Colston (1636 – 1721) comes down, his company was responsible for the capture, transport and sale of 100,000 slaves in the Caribbean and the Americas. Colston made his fortune from slave trading, and, not-with-standing that he later became a philanthropist, his wealth and life flourished by the misery of others. I my view, people who profit from the misery of others do not deserve any public recognition or honour.

“I know the removal of the Colston statue will divide opinion, as the statue itself has done for many years. However it’s important to listen to those who found the statue an affront to humanity.” Marvin Rees (Mayor of Bristol)

Rising

The statues of subjugation crash
to the ground of the past,
we're loving a new now,
the beginning of future dreams,
free-ranged, unwrapped,
letting go Aquarius' aged darkness,
rising to unison of heart,
pace the whispers of worm tongues
who would hold oppression lightly,
but whose account is well due.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

Note: I have used pace in preposition form, expressing disagreement with worm tongues with those who support enslavement of any kind.

32 Comments

Filed under challenge, Free Verse, history, injustice, life, poem, quote, Racism

32 responses to “Rising – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

  1. This is so well written Paul, and not sure if you could hear me, but I was exclaiming Yes! all along.

    Liked by 4 people

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  3. I wish everyone would read this beautiful poem full of meaning. Well done, Pvcann.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. A timely and important call to action in your poem. However, I’m sitting here bemused: Who would put up a statue commenorating a slave trader in the first place?

    Liked by 1 person

    • He gave loads of money to Bristol city, he was a member of the Tory Party – right wing conservatives, and I guess those who saw the4 colour of his money and political leanings honoured that. We really must stop honouring evil people.

      Like

  5. It is a symbolic act but one that needs to be done. I don’t think the statues should be destroyed because they are works of art. Instead place them in a Museum of Slavery/Oppression/Exploitation. There needs to be full disclosure of what these individuals did so youngsters can learn.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Beautifully said, actions like this don’t need to be aggressive.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Poems like this need to be written, published, Paul. I recently read some articles on what white people can do and several suggested writing essays, poetry, stories, doing art, etc. You have done this and done it well. I am working on a poem about my white privilege and it is difficult to write, but must be expressed. You have encouraged me. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you you for sharing that, you are intentional, it will arrive, and I’m looking forward to reading it. Yes, I agree wholeheartedly, we must do whatever we can using the skills we have. What a year this has been.

      Liked by 1 person

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  9. 100,000 souls. That is devastating.

    Like

  10. Beautifully said, at the same time heartbreaking. Well written 👍👍👍
    Please keep going❤️

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Well written Paul! Lets hope there will be an enlightenment, and one can stop slavery, also the new one called “human trafficking”. At least all branches of organized crime, and in my opinion too many state leaders and churches involved too. Michael

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Charis Counselling

    Great poem – well said

    >

    Liked by 1 person

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