Veneer – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

dVerse Poets – Open Link Night

Lillian at dVerse is hosting Open Link Night which means an opportunity to post a poem of your choice.

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Photo: Better Homes and Gardens, January 1951

 

“You can get the man out of the stone -age, but not the stone-age out of the man.”  Abhijit Naskar

 

Veneer

The old panels were tired
and out of place,
relics of the forties and fifties,
so we settled on a transformation,
new ideas, life, and colours,
it was simple really
but so effective,
though lately I’ve noticed
that the laminates are lifting
in some places and the
bakelite’s showing through,
seems that all the transformations
were just that,
insubstantial veneers,
and the laminates are surrendering,
giving way to the old once more.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

Paul, pvcann.com

 

 

55 Comments

Filed under Free Verse, life, poem, quote

55 responses to “Veneer – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

  1. I’m loving that kitchen with the red touches.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I like your description of transformations as insubstantial veneers.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I have heard that same saying, but Brooklyn was used in place of stone-age.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Yes, the core remains…the layers come and go. So true of our lives, I feel.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Changing what is within is the true transformation.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. so many look at outside appearance and then get bored after a time

    Liked by 1 person

  7. hypercryptical

    Clever write.
    New things lose their gloss after time…
    Anna :o]

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Veneer indeed… The Stone age creeping back out? 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately. Seems all around me the veneers of my country are peeling…I had really assumed the changes were truly changes of heart, and I keep trying to figure out exactly why and when things started to fall apart.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. First of all, I love the approach open link followed by your eloquent composition. 💕☕️☕️

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Excellent poem, Paul. I really like it.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Very clever, Paul.
    I love it.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Yes – our homes and our selves- constantly calling for renovations.

    Liked by 3 people

  14. Another trenchant metaphor for the unsettled times in which we live! As a veteran of the home renovation wars, it particularly resonated with me. (Those metal kitchen cabinets must have seemed like a good idea at the time to someone, but they weren’t.)

    Liked by 3 people

  15. This is spectacular! I was first stopped dead in my tracks…looking carefully at the illustration you chose. I REMEMBER that type of stool, my mother wearing an apron, etc.
    THEN I saw the title and I wondered how you were going to connect it.
    OH and then I read and connected! Yup — many have replaced those cabinets; “up dated” kitchens, refinished furniture, stripped away the linoleum and put down new floors, etc…..only to find that it’s much harder to strip away a cultural bias, etc….and it is all just like laminate that is now slipping from the surface and peeling. I could even equate this to the political scene that is now playing itself out….etc.
    Just a great write that applies to so much!

    Liked by 3 people

    • You nailed it Lillian, yes the double meaning in metaphor. I have been so disappointed in the rolling back of so many positive gains of the past five decades, and the veneer that we seem to have adopted for so long wearing thin and peeling. Thank you so much for your insights and so glad this connected for you.

      Like

  16. ouch a sad reflection of too many lives …
    personally and politically we wear the mask
    which will eventually slip not up to the task
    words are meaningless
    when no action follows …

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Oh Paul, this works for me on so many levels (pun not really intended) 😉

    Liked by 2 people

  18. What a wonderful poem, meeting the quote too. Reading it came in my mind, whats here called “the good old time”, but with a missed definition. Michael

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Wow, a really good depiction of how every progression can sometimes become stale, and thus we have to start over to find a new transformation to admire.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. I love this. You’ve got a nice blog, and I’m glad to follow you. 🤗

    It’s an honor to be here 🙇 . I hope I can make good friends with you💐

    Liked by 1 person

  21. lync56

    Very thought provoking

    >

    Liked by 1 person

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