Perhaps He Prayed – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

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Photo: abc.net.au

“We won’t embrace reckless targets and abandon our traditional industries that would risk Australian jobs while having no meaningful impact on the global climate.”  Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison

Australia has been reluctant to engage climate change as politicians play to captains of industry and look to past glories of trade. Australia has been tardy on carbon emissions treating them with disdain and suspicion. The Prime Minister went on holiday amidst the national fire crisis, was slow to lead on the issue when he finally decided there was a crisis and came home, and though has flown over the sites closest, has not been on the ground very much, deadpanning the fires as a “backdrop to the cricket.” He was slow to deploy military assets. But the critical issue is that he’s not leading.

 

Perhaps He Prayed

Like a rabbit in the spotlight
he froze, glazed,
dithering and uncertain,
but hey, it’s summer
which is meant to be fun,
so he smiled and said strange words,
warm platitudes he’d heard from others
a generation ago,
all christmassy and matey,
don’t worry mate, she’ll be right,
so he did a little speech
just like the queen
but with no content
wittering on about the Aussie spirit,
and volunteers doing it for free,
then he lolled about with cricket players
and held a dinner party,
but that’s far safer than trying to
find Mallacoota or Batemans Bay
and stand with the widow,
the injured, and the bereft
in the scarred and murdered land,
where we hold solemn farewells
for flora and fauna,
what now your lump of coal
and disdain for wind turbines,
but you just can’t say the words
that really matter.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

Paul, pvcann.com

70 Comments

Filed under Country, environment, Free Verse, life, nature, poem, quote

70 responses to “Perhaps He Prayed – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

  1. He sounds like a clone of our president and I’m guessing maybe the UK’s PM. Is this the current version of Nero fiddling while Rome (or parts of Australia or California) burn to the ground?

    Liked by 5 people

    • He is In some ways similar and comes from that side of politics and that mentality. Yes, there’s a cartoon of the PM as Nero, sad that they don’t even see it.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Our President has made incredibly progress in a lot of areas. Why the attitude that he does nothing? May Australia be so fortunate. And maybe UK also. He has had a very short time for you to have labeled him as do nothing already. Methinks we must have had minds made up before these men has a chance. Or is global warming the only issue by which they are judged?: Nice poem, however, Paul. Words are much easier to come by than actions. Hey I’m a friend blogger to you all. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sadly Oneta, the public record shows the president to be not what he seems, I struggle with his attitude to women, the environment, and the now documented multitude of lies, so I guess I’m judging him on integrity which is critical for me. Same with our leader, who is a weak leader and blind to refugees, women, and so many issues. Boris is an overprivileged yob in my view. I think for me the editorial in Christianity Today last week sums it up, that these leaders lack a moral compass, they are indeed immoral, but somehow they bewitch people to support them. I find that deeply disturbing. Thank you for reading and responding to the poem 🙂 Yes, and friends can have different views.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. What is it that gets this type if person in office, just false promises and money?

    Liked by 2 people

  3. So very very scary and sad and infuriating.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. Trump’s trips to Mar-a-Lago have cost over 64 million so far…what is happening to our world?

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Powerful perspective on truly tragic events and dangers, Paul. Sending loving, healing thoughts to you and all in Australia.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Many thanks Carol, it is the worst I’ve seen it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • You have been in my thoughts when I see the news. Where are you in relation to the fires, Paul?

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’m no where near the current fires, the distance between New York and Los Angeles. So on our eastern seaboard. We’ve had two nasty ones here in the West already but nothing like the current ones in the east. We had a devastating fire near here three years ago which wiped out an entire town. Ours come in late January, February, when the summer thunderstorms come. The loss of rare species is uppermost in my mind and the death of so many creatures. Very sad.

        Like

      • Thank you for helping me understand the geography in Australia and more about where you are located. It’s hard for me to get a sense of where events are happening and what is actually going on from the news…

        Liked by 1 person

      • News bites are hopeless and names foreign, same happens in reverse for me. My pleasure.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. I sometimes wonder if there are any “It’s about us” leaders left. The “All about me” team is doing us in.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. A 2020 year full of achievements on all levels! Happy Birthday!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. How many thousands of people are now out of work because fire destroyed the places they worked?
    We no longer make our own products (no whitegoods, no vehicles, no steelworks), and he seems to have forgotten that we no longer have ‘traditional industries’.
    Power is fleeting, life is short — and memories are long, especially where spineless pollies are concerned.
    I am so angry at the idiot mentioned – is he so deaf and blind that he can’t see or hear? What was that old saying? Close the mouth and open the ears in order to know what surrounds.
    I am very afraid for all the people I know all along the south coast, all through Gippsland, all over this country where fires are destroying lives and dreams …

    Liked by 2 people

    • I so agree, if he came here I’d slap him, I wouldn’t be able to help myself, blind and deaf indeed. The other aspect is species loss too, especially rare flora listed in those areas, and not the loss of trees albeit our lungs.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Cage, we still do have traditional industries. We make glass, aluminium alumina, concrete, paper. Paper is going to be a problem because the softwood plantations were gutted in these fires. We have two steelworks (I think Bluescope is still operating at Port Kembla) and there is still a steelworks at Whyalla. They use a lot of power. I note that the owner of the Whyalla Steelworks is plans to invest in Australia’s biggest solar farm (according to Ross Garnaut). Fugitive emissions from coal seam gas are pushing up our emissions. It seems the world wants more of our gas. Then there is coal. Not making excuses for our leader, but it is complicated. Maybe some of those industries will no longer be viable without “big” power. Who knows? But we have no choice but to cut emissions quickly and as is evident now, drastically, if this planet is to survive with us on it. The choices become starker and more expensive, the longer we delay. I’m not making excuses for the leader. It is hard to go at it when you’re competitors are not doing the same. However, the choice is simple to me, we need to cut otherwise we will have no economy left at all. Sorry for butting in.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. well aimed shot at a parasite, he has zero leadership qualities and even less ability as a human bean! Insensitive snot should spend a day with our firefighters then I’m sure they’d receive more resources.

    You are so right todays faux leaders were selected by those with real power and excessive wealth because they are mere puppets, unable to think or act for the people who foolishly elected them. It freaks me out to wonder where all this is going …

    Liked by 3 people

  10. I feel the frustration. Hope things improve Paul.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. not just in Australia but across the world Paul, those voted into power to protect and govern run at the first sight of trouble, so frustrating and rude! so sorry to read about this devastation, be safe.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. You captured that wonderfully, Paul. Sadly, it’s an attitude which is all too prevalent in politicians across the world, whose eyes look no further that the next election, and industrialists whose eyes are focused only on the bottom line. Perhaps there is some hope in the power of our environmentalist youth?

    Glad to hear you’re okay where you are.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Reblogged this on The Reluctant Poet and commented:
    Australia is burning! Please keep Australia in your prayers!!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Thanks for the reasoned response. We will remain unconvinced of the other side.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. It’s so unfortunate most politicians have no common sense and/or sense of responsibility.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Thank you for this great post! I really enjoyed reading it! I have recently published an article on my blog regarding my thoughts on Scott Morrison and his leadership during Australia’s bushfire crisis. If you have time, it would be great if you could check out my post as I would be really interested to hear your thoughts! Thanks 🙂

    Like

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