These Loathsome Days – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

Deplorable – Word of the Day

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Photo: cdn.newspapi.com.au  The current drought in New South Wales.

 

These Loathsome Days

The dust laments its loss of grass
as the wind whips it to and fro,
while the windmill creaks
and groans to turn a drop,
but the rains have never come.
Call came through this afternoon
that Davo’s shooting sheep,
I guess ours will soon be gone.
There’s nothing for the dogs to do,
no money for the list,
hell, we’ve been down this path before,
and we’ve bounced back,
but I guess I’m older now
and I’m less inclined to fight.
This land of my father’s,
this Eden all dead and dry,
will soon be taken by the bank,
and I’ll be roaming on,
but until the last
I’m standing by,
my eyes fixed for a cloud,
hoping the charity of heaven might come,
O these loathsome bloody days.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

 

Paul,

pvcann.com

33 Comments

Filed under Farm, farming, Free Verse, poem

33 responses to “These Loathsome Days – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

  1. lync56

    Thats a great poem

    >

    Liked by 3 people

  2. A very touching poem and photo.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Geography doesn’t matter. It seems reality in many remote villages in India.

    Liked by 2 people

    • That is very true, and I’m very conscious of that, in fact, we fare better here than some places because there is usually a national response. There so many places round the globe that are drought affected, so sad.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. The climate is changing. Everything is changing.
    In June I walked through a hedge and suddenly noticed: No insects were there. Silence.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Ah, My friend!! I hope this is not autobiographical but fear because it’s intense feelings and emotions that it is!!! I hope you get your rain soon! We here in the hill country of Texas have had an oversupply of rain in the last 10 days. A couple of the rivers had flash flood of 20 feet or more and we have six dams almost filled to capacity with spillways open. Wish we could have share our over abundance with you and your countrymen, Paul!!!
    Really super post!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Fortunately not autobiographical – the drought is on the east coast so on the other side, but I have been through one here in the west, but not as a farmer. What an abundance you’ve had – though that brings its own problems I guess. Many thanks – wonderful compliment

      Liked by 2 people

      • Glad to hear that, Paul!! Yes, about six people lost their lives and so many had their homes and businesses flooded. Fifth highest lake level ever. Yes, I guess this helps gives a personal meaning to “When it rains it pours” – too much of a good thing! hope you’ve had a great weekend!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sad that people died, what a volume of water that must have been. Thanks

        Like

  6. oh look out Banjo and Lawson … great take!

    Liked by 2 people

  7. This is so painful to read. What atrocities a drought brings to the family of farm owners and or farmers who depend solely on the nature mercy. Hoping the drought goes away soon and you are blessed by rain.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Well written. Like a prayer,i think. Thank you, Paul! Best wishes.Michael

    Liked by 2 people

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