Cacophany

via Daily Prompt: Cacophony

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The Pied Cormorant, commonly called “Shag”, though this is erroneous, because originally shags and cormorants were distinct, now the term has become interchangeable (though that is now in dispute). The name Cormorant evolved from and is derived from the Greek meaning Bald Raven (φαλακρος κοραξ) and later from the Latin corvus marinus or sea raven. It was orginally thought that the Cormorant was relative of the raven (up to the mid 16th C.), mainly becuase of its hooked beak. In the photo, taken on the Blackwood River a few years ago, the one at the back right is displaying the Cormorant’s particular wing drying habit, having dove into the water pursuing fish. As we passed by they had called out. Now they are not as discordant as a Raven or a Black Cockatoo, but nor are they a sing-song bird that can charm the ear with fine song. Instead they created a raucus cacophany that jarred my ears. But it mattered not, they were simply in their element, and I was an intruder. I was glad to be jarred, to be privileged to hear their conversation. It was like I had been invited to the conversation.

Paul,

pvcann.com

5 Comments

Filed under kayaking, nature, Uncategorized

5 responses to “Cacophany

  1. They saved a seat for you!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I recently learned, that a birds song usually has more than one meaning. It transports several messages at the same time. This is something a human isn’t able to, He can transport some subtle underlying meanings in his sentence but this is a different thing. A bird can praise the warm and sunny weather, describe his place and at the same time call out for a spouse. All in one song.

    Liked by 1 person

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